Righteous & Wrong

Paul Berman’s The Flight of the Intellectuals elaborates on the theme of an embattled liberal civilization facing a totalitarian or fascist onslaught. The book points an accusing finger at two particular writers—Ian Buruma and Timothy Garton-Ash—whom Berman regards as exemplifying liberal intellectual pusillanimity. Berman, however, is not to be bothered by inconvenient truths that might arrest the flow of his rhetoric. His vision is crassly ideological: facts that might interfere with his argument are liable to be discarded or ignored.

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