Real Cool

Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective

an exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, May 23–September 3, 2012; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., October 14, 2012–January 13, 2013; Tate Modern, London,
February 21–May 27, 2013; and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, July 3–November 4, 2013
Catalog of the exhibition by James Rondeau and Sheena Wagstaff with contributions by Clare Bell, Yve-Alain Bois, and others
Art Institute of Chicago/ Tate Modern/Yale University Press, 368 pp., $65.00

Andy Warhol: Fame and Misfortune

an exhibition at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, February 1–May 20, 2012
Catalog of the exhibition by René Paul Barilleaux, with an essay by Justin Spring
McNay Art Museum/DAP/ Distributed Art Publishers, 79 pp., $29.95

One of the more memorable encounters in the history of modern art occurred late in 1961 when the period’s preeminent avant-garde dealer, Leo Castelli, paid a call at the Upper East Side Manhattan townhouse-cum-studio of Andy Warhol, whose pioneering Pop paintings based on cartoon characters including Dick Tracy, the Little King, Nancy, Popeye, and Superman had caught the eye of Castelli’s gallery director, Ivan Karp, who in turn urged his boss to go have a look for himself. Warhol, eager to make the difficult leap from commercial artist to “serious” painter, decades later recalled his crushing disappointment when Castelli coolly told him, “Well, it’s unfortunate, the timing, because I just took on Roy Lichtenstein, and the two of you in the same gallery would collide.”

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