Alastair Reid


Alastair Reid (1926 -2014) was a poet, prose chronicler, translator, and traveler. Born in Scotland, he came to the United States in the early 1950s, began publishing his poems in The New Yorker in 1951, and for the next fifty-odd years was a traveling correspondent for that magazine. Having lived in both Spain and Latin America for long spells, he was a constant translator of poetry from the Spanish language, in particular the work of Jorge Luis Borges and Pablo Neruda. He published more than forty books, among them two word books for children, Ounce Dice Trice, with drawings by Ben Shahn, and Supposing…, with drawings by Bob Gill, both available from The New York Review Children’s Collection.

Books
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    Álvaro Mutis

    Álvaro Mutis is indisputably one of the greatest Latin American writers of the 20th century, best known for creating Maqroll the Gaviero, a character forever searching for love and riches that he knows are ephemeral. Until now English-language readers enraptured by Maqroll have been unable to sample the poems in which he first appeared. This volume brings together for the first time in English, a selection Mutis’s surrealist-tinged, yet utterly sui generis poetical works.

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    Supposing…

    The author of Ounce Dice Trice brings his love of wordplay and delight in the unfettered imagination to this collaboration with a groundbreaking designer and illustrator. Supposing will take you places you never dared imagine.

  • Alastair Reid’s Witty Wordplay Collection

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    Ounce Dice Trice

    Ben Shahn illustrates this notebook of fabulous words: heavy words, squishy words, made up words, names for cats, whales, and houses. Says the author: “All the words here are meant to be said aloud, over and over, for your own delight.”