Arthur Conan Doyle


Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) graduated from Edinburgh University with a medical degree in 1881 and traveled as a ship’s doctor before settling down into a private practice. He wrote Sherlock Holmes stories for four years before killing off the suave detective, only to resurrect him in The Hound of the Baskervilles in 1902. His historical fiction took the form of a novel, The White Company (1891), and the epic tales of the adventurous Brigadier Gerard.

Books
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    The Exploits and Adventures of Brigadier Gerard

    The Brigadier’s wonderful comic adventures, long established in the affections of Conan Doyle’s admirers as second only to those of the incomparable Holmes, are sure to find new devotees among the ardent fans of such writers as Patrick O’Brian and George MacDonald Fraser.