Bruce Duffy


Bruce Duffy is the author of the autobiographical novel Last Comes the Egg (1997), and—to appear June 2011— Disaster Was My God, a novel based on the life and work of the poet Arthur Rimbaud. An only child raised in a Catholic middle-class family in suburban Maryland, Duffy sees the 1962 death of his mother—essentially by medical malpractice— as what pushed him to be a writer. Duffy graduated from the University of Maryland in 1973, and has hitchhiked twice across the United States, worked construction, washed dishes, hopped freight trains with hoboes, and reported stories that have taken him to Haiti, Bosnia, and Taliban Afghanistan. Today he lives just outside Washington, D.C., works as a speechwriter, is married to a psychotherapist, and has two grown daughters and a stepson. Writing in Salon, Joyce Carol Oates named The World As I Found It as one of “five great nonfiction novels,” calling it “one of the most ambitious first novels ever published.” A former Guggenheim fellow, Duffy has won the Whiting Writers’ Award and a Lila Wallace–Reader’s Digest Award.

Books
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    The World As I Found It

    An enthralling experiment that goes beyond biography to reveal the imagined lives of some of the greatest thinkers of the last century: Ludwig Wittgenstein, G.E. Moore, and Bertrand Russell. “One of the more astonishing literary debuts in recent memory…. Mr. Duffy gave…more than 500 pages of dazzling language and dizzying speculation on the life of Ludwig Wittgenstein.” —A.O. Scott