Gabriel Chevallier


Gabriel Chevallier (1895–1969) was the son of a notary clerk and lived in Lyon for most of his life. He was called up at the start of World War I and wounded a year later. Returning to the front, he spent the remainder of the war as an infantryman, and was ultimately awarded the Croix de Guerre and named Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur. He began writing Fear in 1925 but did not publish it until 1930, a year after his first novel, Durand: voyageur de commerce, was released. Fear was suppressed during World War II and not made available again until 1951, by which time Chevallier had earned international fame for his Clochemerle (1934), a comedy of provincial French manners of the Beaujolais region that sold several million copies. In all Chevallier would write twenty-one novels, including several more set in the fictional village of Clochemerle.

Books
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    Fear

    Winner of the 2013 Scott Moncrieff Prize for Translation from the French. “Eighty years after it was first published … Gabriel Chevallier’s autobiographical novel about serving in the bombed-out trenches of World War I still chills the blood….Fear is a novel whose most indelible passages describe the sensory degradation of war on the human body…. One of the most effective indictments of war ever written.”—Tobias Grey, The Wall Street Journal