Daniel Mendelsohn


Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Books
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    Augustus

    Williams’s biographical treatment of the founder of the Roman Empire won him the National Book Award and reveals him to be as transformative a writer of historical novels as he is of westerns (in Butcher’s Crossing) and the campus drama (in Stoner).

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    Waiting for the Barbarians

    Daniel Mendelsohn—hailed by The Economist as one of the finest critics writing in the English language today—brings together a selection of his recent critical essays.

  • book image

    Waiting for the Barbarians

    Daniel Mendelsohn—hailed by The Economist as one of the finest critics writing in the English language today—brings together a selection of his recent critical essays.