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Title Author Description
book image Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age
Dancing Lessons
Bohumil Hrabal
Hrabal
+ Description

An elderly roué, passing a group of sunbathing women, reminisces about the women he has known. Part drunken boast, part confession, part metaphysical poem on the nature of love and time, this astonishing novel (which unfolds in a single monumental sentence) shows why Milan Kundera called Hrabal “our very best writer today.”
Contributors: Adam Thirlwell , Michael Henry Heim

book image The Pumpkin Eater
Pumpkin Eater
Penelope Mortimer
Mortimer
+ Description

An exquisitely surreal black comedy about marriage, motherhood, and the madness of modern life. "(Mortimer) is the family historian of the smart, go ahead, two-car household which has a double load of private misery packed in each boot." —Robert Pitman, Sunday Express
Contributors: Daphne Merkin

book image We Think the World of You
We Think the World of You
J. R. Ackerley
Ackerley
+ Description

“Boy meets dog, boy loses dog, boy gets dog. The book is both breezy and sad...Ackerley’s appeal lies in his graceful, ironic style: His books are candid confessions of a good friend, full of small, hilarious surprises.” —Peter Terzian, Out
Contributors: P. N. Furbank

book image After Claude
After Claude
Iris Owens
Owens
+ Description

Funny and foulmouthed, Harriet tears around Greenwich Village insulting friend and foe alike. But when “the French rat” Claude leaves her (or did she leave Claude?), Harriet is adrift. That is, until she discovers an unlikely savior in a dark room at the Chelsea Hotel. “Spikey with mockery, carbon steel wit and mature observation.” —The Village Voice
Contributors: Emily Prager

book image The Outward Room
Outward Room
Millen Brand
Brand
+ Description

The Outward Room was a sensation when first published in 1937. It is the story of a young woman’s path from suffering to deep fulfillment, set in Depression-era New York City. “One of those firmly painted, exquisite miniatures of life...that contrive to be unsparing and honest, and at the same time refreshing and lovely.” —Theodore Dreiser
Contributors: Peter Cameron

book image The World As I Found It
World as I Found It
Bruce Duffy
Duffy
+ Description

An enthralling experiment that goes beyond biography to reveal the imagined lives of some of the greatest thinkers of the last century: Ludwig Wittgenstein, G.E. Moore, and Bertrand Russell. “One of the more astonishing literary debuts in recent memory.... Mr. Duffy gave...more than 500 pages of dazzling language and dizzying speculation on the life of Ludwig Wittgenstein.” —A.O. Scott
Contributors: David Leavitt

book image The Mountain Lion
Mountain Lion
Jean Stafford
Stafford
+ Description

The Mountain Lion remains a brilliant achievement, an exploration of adolescence to set beside Carson McCullers’s masterwork The Member of the Wedding.” —Joyce Carol Oates
Contributors: Kathryn Davis

book image The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne
Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne
Brian Moore
Moore
+ Description

A deeply sympathetic portrait of a Belfast woman, come down in the world and denied the comforts once granted to her sort (from the Catholic Church, from her genteel friends), who has a shameful secret. This is the book that launched Brian Moore’s career.
Contributors: Mary Gordon

book image The New York Stories of Elizabeth Hardwick
New York Stories of Elizabeth Hardwick
Elizabeth Hardwick
Hardwick
+ Description

Celebrated stories of living, loving, and surviving in New York's bohemian and literary circles. This collection is the first to gather the short fiction of Elizabeth Hardwick, one of the leading figures of twentieth-century American letters.
Contributors: Darryl Pinckney

book image Nightmare Alley
Nightmare Alley
William Lindsay Gresham
Gresham
+ Description

Nightmare Alley begins with an extraordinary description of a freak-show geek— the object of the voyeuristic crowd's gleeful disgust—going about his work at a county fair. Young Stan Carlisle is working as a carny, and he wonders how a man could fall so low. There's no way that anything like that will ever happen to him.
Contributors: Nick Tosches