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Title Author Description
book image Young Man with a Horn
Young Man with a Horn
Dorothy Baker
Baker
+ Description

This book, loosely inspired by the life of Bix Beiderbecke, is widely regarded as the first jazz novel, and it courses with the verve and swing of the sound that defined an era. It is the story of Rick Martin, a prodigy whose dedication to music cannot save him from self destruction. "Got a kid who's into music? This is the book. Interested in the Jazz Age? Ditto. Or just looking for a short novel that you can't put down? Here you go."—Jesse Kornbluth
Contributors: Gary Giddins

book image The World As I Found It
World as I Found It
Bruce Duffy
Duffy
+ Description

An enthralling experiment that goes beyond biography to reveal the imagined lives of some of the greatest thinkers of the last century: Ludwig Wittgenstein, G.E. Moore, and Bertrand Russell. “One of the more astonishing literary debuts in recent memory.... Mr. Duffy gave...more than 500 pages of dazzling language and dizzying speculation on the life of Ludwig Wittgenstein.” —A.O. Scott
Contributors: David Leavitt

book image Wish Her Safe At Home
Wish Her Safe At Home
Stephen Benatar
Benatar
+ Description

An unexpected inheritance frees Rachel Waring from her dreary life. But will her newfound joie de vivre free her from her grasp on reality as well? Benatar's brilliantly subjective storytelling keeps the reader guessing till the very end.
Contributors: John Carey

book image We Think the World of You
We Think the World of You
J. R. Ackerley
Ackerley
+ Description

“Boy meets dog, boy loses dog, boy gets dog. The book is both breezy and sad...Ackerley’s appeal lies in his graceful, ironic style: His books are candid confessions of a good friend, full of small, hilarious surprises.” —Peter Terzian, Out
Contributors: P. N. Furbank

book image The Water Theatre
Water Theatre
Lindsay Clarke
Clarke
+ Description

A novel that follows war reporter Martin Crowther as he travels to Italy hoping to convince the estranged children of his ailing mentor to visit their father one last time.

book image Walkabout
Walkabout
James Vance Marshall
Marshall
+ Description

“A haunting little idyll in the same vein as A High Wind in Jamaica...tells of two children, a boy and a girl, sole survivors of a plane crash in the Australian bush. Their fragile veneer of modern culture clashes with the primitive soul of a boy who is making his tribal ‘walkabout.’” —Time
Contributors: Lee Siegel

book image The Unrest-Cure and Other Stories
Unrest-Cure and Other Stories
Saki
Saki
+ Description

“Weird, but in a good way” is how The Guardian describes Saki’s fantastical stories, set in Edwardian drawing rooms and garden parties. The same words might be used to describe the illustrations Edward Gorey drew for this selection of Saki’s work, originally commissioned by a Swiss publisher, and never before widely available in an English-language edition.
Contributors: Edward Gorey

book image Turtle Diary
Turtle Diary
Russell Hoban
Hoban
+ Description

A man and a woman, each isolated, desperate and despairing—and utter strangers to the other—are simultaneously seized with the desire to liberate turtles from the London Zoo. Hoban confronts the dangers of modern life, its disconnect from nature and solipsistic atomization, with a dark eye and a generous spirit.
Contributors: Ed Park

book image Tristana
Tristana
Benito Pérez Galdós
Perez Galdos
+ Description

Until now Pérez Galdós's tale of a beautiful and brilliant young woman's attempt to free herself from an imprisoning relationship to a womanizing older man has been recognized more as the inspiration for a Buñuel film of the same name than as a masterpiece in its own right. Margaret Jull Costa's new and fluid translation brings the Spanish realist's story to glorious life.
Contributors: Jeremy Treglown , Margaret Jull Costa

book image Totempole
Totempole
Sanford Friedman
Friedman
+ Description

Friedman's psychologically acute and empathetic masterpiece traces the coming-of-age—from two to twenty-four—of a boy growing up on the Lower East Side of New York. “Vivid and utterly convincing...The truth of Mr. Friedman’s book is not the truth of autobiography, but the truth-making that the best fiction is.”—James Dickey
Contributors: Peter Cameron

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