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Title Author Description
book image After Claude
After Claude
Iris Owens
+ Description

Funny and foulmouthed, Harriet tears around Greenwich Village insulting friend and foe alike. But when “the French rat” Claude leaves her (or did she leave Claude?), Harriet is adrift. That is, until she discovers an unlikely savior in a dark room at the Chelsea Hotel. “Spikey with mockery, carbon steel wit and mature observation.” —The Village Voice
Contributors: Emily Prager

book image Alive: New and Selected Poems
Elizabeth Willis
+ Description

This collection of new and selected poetry from Elizabeth Willis is a perfect primer on the work of one of America's most important and talented contemporary poets. “Willis has the finest ear for the lyric amongst her generation.... The intense beauty of the work is an unblinking testament to the poet’s sense that the stakes for language are becoming impossibly high.” —Richard Deming, Boston Review

book image The Alteration
Kingsley Amis
+ Description

In Kingsley Amis’s virtuoso foray into alternate history, it is 1976 but the modern world is a medieval relic, frozen in intellectual and spiritual time ever since Martin Luther was promoted to pope back in the sixteenth century. "One of the best—possibly the best—alternate-worlds novels in existence."— Philip K. Dick
Contributors: William Gibson

book image The Book of Ebenezer Le Page
Book of Ebenezer Le Page
G.B. Edwards
+ Description

Curmudgeonly and wise, Ebenezer le Page recounts his eighty years on the small island of Guernsey. "A true epic, as sexy as it is hilarious." — Allan Gurganus, O, The Oprah Magazine
Contributors: John Fowles

book image In the Courtyard of the Kabbalist
Courtyard of the Kabbalist
Ruchama King Feuerman
+ Description

This novel, set in Jerusalem, is the story of two expatriate Americans—a kabbalist's assistant and a beautiful motorcycle-riding woman—and an Arab janitor, whose lives become intertwined in a variety of ways in the courtyard of an elderly kabbalist and his wife.

book image Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age
Dancing Lessons
Bohumil Hrabal
+ Description

An elderly roué, passing a group of sunbathing women, reminisces about the women he has known. Part drunken boast, part confession, part metaphysical poem on the nature of love and time, this astonishing novel (which unfolds in a single monumental sentence) shows why Milan Kundera called Hrabal “our very best writer today.”
Contributors: Adam Thirlwell , Michael Henry Heim

book image The Door
Magda Szabó
+ Description

In a prizewinning translation by Len Rix, Magda Szabó’s unsettling and beautiful novel about friendship and tragedy marks Szabó as a major modern European author and formidable writer of female characters. “Clever, moving, frightening, [The Door] deserves to be a bestseller.” —The Telegraph
Contributors: Ali Smith , Len Rix

book image Drum-Taps: The Complete 1865 Edition
Walt Whitman
+ Description

Whitman wrote the poems that make up Drum-Taps in reaction to the suffering "soldier boys" he witnessed in Civil War field hospitals. It was immediately published as a single volume after the end of the war. Later, the poems that make it up were reordered and incorporated into Leaves of Grass. This volume is the first in 150 years to present this work in the form originally intended by its author, revealing the full force of these powerful and profoundly moving poems.
Contributors: Lawrence Kramer

book image During the Reign of the Queen of Persia
During the Reign of the Queen of Persia
Joan Chase
+ Description

Joan Chase’s subtle story of three generations of women in the American Midwest in the 1950s negotiating lifetimes of “joy and ruin” deserves its place alongside such achievements as Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping and Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine. "Moving, unusual and accomplished."—Margaret Atwood
Contributors: Meghan O'Rourke

book image Ending Up
Ending Up
Kingsley Amis
+ Description

“I finished Kingsley Amis’s Ending Up with…a conviction, confirmed in work after work, that he is one of the few living novelists totally incapable of boring me. Ending Up is a sardonic little masterpiece which, with incredible economy and stylistic restraint, shows what old age is really like, and also—far, far better than any other writer I know—what contemporary England is like.” —Anthony Burgess
Contributors: Craig Brown