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Title Author Description
book image Red Lights
Red Lights
Georges Simenon
Simenon
+ Description

Red Lights, one of Simenon's romans durs, is a dark and brilliant gaze at marriage, and is Simenon writing the American psyche at his best.
Contributors: Anita Brookner , Norman Denny

book image Pedigree
Pedigree
Georges Simenon
Simenon
+ Description

Simenon's longest and most personal novel: “Simenon brings to life in Pedigree the whole sensory world of his childhood in Liège. His words capture the sounds, sights, tastes, smells, and textures of the city… Simenon does for Liège what the young Joyce did for Dublin: he evokes the city with such immediacy that we feel we've walked in its streets.” —Lucille Frackman Becker
Contributors: Luc Sante , Robert Baldick

book image Nightmare Alley
Nightmare Alley
William Lindsay Gresham
Gresham
+ Description

Nightmare Alley begins with an extraordinary description of a freak-show geek— the object of the voyeuristic crowd's gleeful disgust—going about his work at a county fair. Young Stan Carlisle is working as a carny, and he wonders how a man could fall so low. There's no way that anything like that will ever happen to him.
Contributors: Nick Tosches

book image The Mad and the Bad
Mad and the Bad
Jean-Patrick Manchette
Manchette
+ Description

The "French Raymond Chandler" is back with this story of an assassination gone wrong and a manic, murderous cross-country road trip. “For Manchette … the crime novel is no mere entertainment, but a means to strip bare the failures of society, ripping through veils of appearance, deceit, and manipulation to the greed and violence that are the society's true engines.”—James Sallis, The Boston Globe
Contributors: James Sallis , Donald Nicholson-Smith

book image Fatale
Fatale
Jean-Patrick Manchette
Manchette
+ Description

J.P. Manchette transformed the modern detective novel into a weapon of gleeful satire and anarchic fun. In Fatale, we watch with alternating horror and fascination as the deadly Aimée drifts into a sleepy provincial town, poised to make a killing.
Contributors: Jean Echenoz , Donald Nicholson-Smith

book image Act of Passion
Act of Passion
Georges Simenon
Simenon
+ Description

Though a family man and a reasonably successful doctor, Charles Alavoine has grown dissatisfied with his existence. A casual liaison seems to promise the release he longs for, but its consequences are far deadlier than he’d anticipated. Simenon’s thriller is at once a personal confession and an indictment of modern society’s deadening moral codes.
Contributors: Roger Ebert , Louise Varèse

book image The Wine-Dark Sea
Wine-Dark Sea
Leonardo Sciascia
Sciascia
+ Description

Sciascia examines the contradictions—sometimes comic, sometimes deadly, and sometimes both—of Sicily's turbulent history and day-to-day life.
Contributors: Albert Mobilio , Avril Bardoni

book image The Widow
Widow
Georges Simenon
Simenon
+ Description

Two outcasts, a widow and a recently released murderer, become involved in a love triangle with the girl next door. Published in the same year and often compared to The Stranger, The Widow is one of Simenon's most powerful and disturbing romans durs.
Contributors: Paul Theroux , John Petrie

book image To Each His Own
To Each His Own
Leonardo Sciascia
Sciascia
+ Description

To Each His Own is one of the masterworks of the great Sicilian novelist Leonardo Sciascia?a gripping and unconventional detective story that is also an anatomy of a society founded on secrets, lies, collusion, and violence.
Contributors: W.S. Di Piero , Adrienne Foulke

book image Three Bedrooms in Manhattan
Three Bedrooms
Georges Simenon
Simenon
+ Description

An actor and a divorcée meet in a deserted New York City bar. With little in common save loneliness, middle age, and a presentiment of escape, they improvise a love story.
Contributors: Joyce Carol Oates , Marc Romano, Lawrence G. Blochman

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