Silvina Ocampo cover

Silvina Ocampo

Silvina Ocampo, a new translation from the Spanish by Jason Weiss

Silvina Ocampo possessed her own special enchantment as a poet, and only now is her extraordinary poetic achievement becoming more widely recognized beyond Latin America.

Remarkably, this is the first collection of Ocampo’s poetry to appear in English. From her early sonnets on the native Argentine landscape, to her meditations on love’s travails, to her explorations of the kinship between plant and animal realms, to her clairvoyant inquiries into history and myth and memory, readers will find the full range of Ocampo’s “metaphysical lyricism” (The Independent) represented in this groundbreaking edition.

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Drum-Taps: The Complete 1865 Edition

Walt Whitman, edited and with an introduction by Lawrence Kramer
Whitman wrote the poems that make up Drum-Taps in reaction to the suffering “soldier boys” he witnessed in Civil War field hospitals. It was immediately published as a single volume after the end of the war. Later, the poems that make it up were reordered and incorporated into Leaves of Grass. This volume is the first in 150 years to present this work in the form originally intended by its author, revealing the full force of these powerful and profoundly moving poems.

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Alive: New and Selected Poems

This collection of new and selected poetry from Elizabeth Willis is a perfect primer on the work of one of America’s most important and talented contemporary poets. “Willis has the finest ear for the lyric amongst her generation…. The intense beauty of the work is an unblinking testament to the poet’s sense that the stakes for language are becoming impossibly high.” —Richard Deming, Boston Review

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Cat Town

Sakutarō Hagiwara, translated from the Japanese by Hiroaki Sato
Sakutarō Hagiwara is the ultimate modern Japanese poet. He first perfected the use of the colloquial language as a medium for modern poetic expression. Using that language, he reveals a sensibility that can be tough, neurotic, ironic, touching, and profound, sometimes all in the same poem. Always rhythmic and occasionally obscure, poem after poem can represent a scintillating verbal and spiritual adventure, particularly in the lucid and elegant translations created by Hiroaki Sato.”—J. Thomas Rimer

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Nothing More to Lose

Najwan Darwish, translated from the Arabic by Kareem James Abu-Zeid
Hailed across the Arab world and beyond as a singular expression of the Palestinian struggle, Darwish’s poetry walks the razor’s edge between despair and resistance, between dark humor and harsh reality. “While his poetry is at times political, it embodies a universal message, reminiscent of the great mystical poets like Rumi.”—Poetry International

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Love Sonnets and Elegies

Louise Labé, edited and translated from the French by Richard Sieburth, preface by Karin Lessing
Now hailed as the French Renaissance’s answer to Sappho, Labé was little known until Rilke’s celebrated translations of her poems appeared in 1918. “Light-years ahead of her time, Louise Labé jumped the gender divide, charted her own amorous destiny, wrote dazzling poetry, and became ‘one of the most celebrated women of her time.’”—Betsy Proileau

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