Love Sonnets and Elegies cover

Love Sonnets and Elegies

Louise Labé, edited and translated from the French by Richard Sieburth, preface by Karin Lessing

Louise Labé, one of the most original poets of the French Renaissance, published her complete Works around the age of thirty and then disappeared from history. Rediscovered in the nineteenth century, her incandescent love sonnets were later translated into German by Rilke and appear here in a revelatory new English version by the award-winning translator Richard Sieburth.

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Nothing More to Lose

Najwan Darwish, translated from the Arabic by Kareem James Abu-Zeid
Hailed across the Arab world and beyond as a singular expression of the Palestinian struggle, Darwish’s poetry walks the razor’s edge between despair and resistance, between dark humor and harsh reality. “While his poetry is at times political, it embodies a universal message, reminiscent of the great mystical poets like Rumi.”—Poetry International

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Pierre Reverdy

As Frank O’Hara once wrote in a poem, ‘My heart is in my pocket, it is Poems by Pierre Reverdy.’ A Catholic who lived much of his life in quasi-monasticism after an intense relationship with Coco Chanel, Reverdy has remained one of the most singular poets of his generation, and was described by André Breton as “The greatest poet of the time.” Here is a life-spanning selection of the French modernist’s work by the most revered translators of the language.

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Miguel Hernández

Miguel Hernández, selected and translated by Don Share
A career-spanning collection of one of the greatest Spanish poets of the 20th century. “Miguel Hernández sang in his deep voice and his singing was as though all the trees were singing.” —Octavio Paz

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Cat Town: Selected Poems

Sakutarō Hagiwara, translated from the Japanese by Hiroaki Sato
Sakutarō Hagiwara is the ultimate modern Japanese poet. He first perfected the use of the colloquial language as a medium for modern poetic expression. Using that language, he reveals a sensibility that can be tough, neurotic, ironic, touching, and profound, sometimes all in the same poem. Always rhythmic and occasionally obscure, poem after poem can represent a scintillating verbal and spiritual adventure, particularly in the lucid and elegant translations created by Hiroaki Sato.”—J. Thomas Rimer

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