Nothing More to Lose cover

Nothing More to Lose

Najwan Darwish, translated from the Arabic by Kareem James Abu-Zeid

Nothing More to Lose is the first collection of poems by Palestinian poet Najwan Darwish to appear in English. Hailed across the Arab world and beyond, Darwish’s poetry walks the razor’s edge between despair and resistance, between dark humor and harsh political realities. With incisive imagery and passionate lyricism, Darwish confronts themes of equality and justice while offering a radical, more inclusive, rewriting of what it means to be both Arab and Palestinian living in Jerusalem, his birthplace.

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Love Sonnets and Elegies

Louise Labé, edited and translated from the French by Richard Sieburth, preface by Karin Lessing
Now hailed as the French Renaissance’s answer to Sappho, Labé was little known until Rilke’s celebrated translations of her poems appeared in 1918. “Light-years ahead of her time, Louise Labé jumped the gender divide, charted her own amorous destiny, wrote dazzling poetry, and became ‘one of the most celebrated women of her time.’”—Betsy Proileau

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Pierre Reverdy

As Frank O’Hara once wrote in a poem, ‘My heart is in my pocket, it is Poems by Pierre Reverdy.’ A Catholic who lived much of his life in quasi-monasticism after an intense relationship with Coco Chanel, Reverdy has remained one of the most singular poets of his generation, and was described by André Breton as “The greatest poet of the time.” Here is a life-spanning selection of the French modernist’s work by the most revered translators of the language.

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Miguel Hernández

Miguel Hernández, selected and translated by Don Share
A career-spanning collection of one of the greatest Spanish poets of the 20th century. “Miguel Hernández sang in his deep voice and his singing was as though all the trees were singing.” —Octavio Paz

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Cat Town

Sakutarō Hagiwara, translated from the Japanese by Hiroaki Sato
Sakutarō Hagiwara is the ultimate modern Japanese poet. He first perfected the use of the colloquial language as a medium for modern poetic expression. Using that language, he reveals a sensibility that can be tough, neurotic, ironic, touching, and profound, sometimes all in the same poem. Always rhythmic and occasionally obscure, poem after poem can represent a scintillating verbal and spiritual adventure, particularly in the lucid and elegant translations created by Hiroaki Sato.”—J. Thomas Rimer

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