Amia Srinivasan teaches philosophy at UCL, and is a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford.

Follow Amia Srinivasan on Twitter: @amiasrinivasan.

IN THE REVIEW

More Equal Than Others

One Another’s Equals: The Basis of Human Equality

by Jeremy Waldron
All men are created equal—but in what sense equal? Obviously not in the sense of being endowed with the same attributes, abilities, wants, or needs: some people are smarter, kinder, and funnier than others; some want to climb mountains while others want to watch TV; and some require physical or emotional support to do things that others can do on their own. And presumably they are not “equal” in the sense of demanding identical treatment: a father can give aspirin to his sick child and not his healthy one without disrespecting the equality of his children. Rather, all humans are said to be equal in what philosophers call the “basic,” “abstract,” “deep,” or “moral” sense of equality. We are all, in some fundamental sense, and despite our various differences, of equal worth, demanding, in Ronald Dworkin’s famous phrase, “equal concern and respect.”