Ariel Dorfman, an emeritus professor of literature at Duke University, is the author of the play Death and the Maiden and the forthcoming book of essays Homeland Security Ate My Speech and the novel Darwin’s Ghosts.

NYR DAILY

Trump’s War on Knowledge

President Donald Trump looking at the solar eclipse without protective glasses, with his wife Melania and son Barron at the White House, Washington, D.C.,  August 21, 2017

There has always been a disturbing strand of anti-intellectualism in American life, but never has an occupant of the White House exhibited such a toxic mix of ignorance and mendacity, such lack of intellectual curiosity and disregard for rigorous analysis. “The experts are terrible,” Donald Trump said during his campaign. “Look at the mess we’re in with all these experts that we have.” It is hardly surprising, then, that his administration is over-stocked with know-nothing fundamentalists.

Nuclear Apocalypse Now?

An illustration by Chesley Bonestell for

The most telling aspect of Trump’s UN speech was, after threatening to “totally destroy North Korea,” his calling the possibility of nuclear conflict “unthinkable.” On the contrary, we must think about it. And crucial to any understanding of the moral import of the possible use of nuclear weapons is to go back to the foundational moment of this nuclear age and ask again: Were Hiroshima and Nagasaki war crimes?