Cambodia, C’est Moi

The American edition of Prince Norodom Sihanouk’s second book[^1] appears just as he has again announced that he is giving up “all political activity” and will not be traveling, as expected, to Singapore, Australia, and other countries.[^2] This appears to rule out (at least for the time being) a visit …

Please Pass the Parmesan

Of the enormous number of cook-books published each year, few are seriously engaged with the cooking of Italy. To be sure, so-called Italian cookbooks compiled by aggressive restaurateurs, weary professional cook-book writers, or gourmandising tourists appear more frequently than one would wish. To view them as anything but the shoddy …

The Yellow Peril

The classic Chinese cuisine is almost always so sharply antithetic to the goals of Western cooking that we must view as a significant culinary development the great number of Chinese cookbooks being written and sold in the United States today. This is comparable to a similar expansion of interest in …

Chock Full of Nuts

If the sources which have contributed to the world’s highly developed cuisines are often difficult to disentangle, one can scarcely hope to find one’s way with ease through the labyrinth of American cooking. The vastness of the United States, the prodigal output of its dairies, farms, lakes, rivers, and oceans, …

The French Way

If any cuisine may be described as architectonic, it must surely be the French. Structured, controlled, and at its best never less than inspired, la vrai cuisine fran├žaise is cooking which with some justification can lay claim to being an art. Certainly most other cuisines have been unable to resist …

Gospels of American Cooking

At the turn of the century, an American cookbook was expected to contain not only recipes for the fashionable dishes of the day, but remedies for everything from leaking faucets to receding hairlines. A cookbook devoted wholly to food was inconceivable. As scientific frontiers expanded and the nature of nutrition …

Table d’Hote

If cookbook writing is somewhat less than inspired today, it had a more illustrious past. Or so, at least, Esther B. Aresty says in her book about cookbooks, The Delectable Past. An intense bibliophile, she has collected cookbooks for the past twenty years, and her impressive library, listed only partially …