Randall Jarrell (1914-1965) was born in Tennessee and graduated from Vanderbilt. A poet, novelist, translator, and critic as well as writer for children, Jarrell was a prolific author whose best-known works include the poems collected in The Woman at the Washington Zoo and The Lost World, the academic comedy Pictures from an Institution, the children’s story The Bat Poet, and Poetry and the Age, a group of essays. An influential critic who, as poetry reviewer for The Nation, helped to launch the careers of Robert Lowell and other contemporaries, Jarrell taught for many years at the University of North Carolina, where he was much revered. He died in a car accident in 1965.

Two Poems by Randall Jarrell

These two previously unpublished poems by Randall Jarrell (1914– 1965) can be found at the major repository of Jarrell’s papers, the Berg Collection of English and American Literature at the New York Public Library. “When, lit as in a painting of Latour’s…” exists there only in typescript, untitled, in a …

Well Water

What a girl called “the dailiness of life” (Adding an errand to your errand. Saying, “Since you’re up…” Making you a means to A means to a means to) is well water Pumped from an old well at the bottom of the world. The pump …

The Lost Children

Two little girls, one fair, one dark, One alive, one dead, are running hand in hand Through a sunny house. The two are dressed In red and white gingham, with puffed sleeves and sashes. They run away from me…But I am happy; When I wake …

Two Poems

THE X-RAY WAITING ROOM IN THE HOSPITAL I am dressed in my big shoes and wrinkled socks And one of the light blue, much-laundered smocks The men and women of this country wear. All of us miss our own underwear And the old days. These new, …