IN THE REVIEW

In Praise of Folly

Madness and Civilization

by Michael Foucault, translated by Richard Howard
(The following essay is reprinted from the last issue of The New York Review, where it appeared with certain passages out of order.) There is much to be said in criticism of Foucault’s study of madness. It is written in a prose of an obscurity so dense as to be …

In Praise of Folly

Madness and Civilization

by Michel Foucault
There is much to be said in criticism of Foucault’s study of madness. It is written in a prose of an obscurity so dense as to be often impenetrable. This is not so much the result of its genuine difficulty of thought as of the author’s arrogance, carelessness, and imprecision.

Grand Illusions

The Looking Glass War

by John le Carré

The Garden of the Finzi-Continis

by Giorgio Bassani
The Second World War remains the overwhelming event of our time. It is possible that even now we have not yet really begun to face it. It is certain that we have not begun to overcome it. It is a trauma in the collective mind of Western society. So much …

The Upper Depths

The Thief's Journal

by Jean Genet, translated by Bernard Frechtman
The Thief’s Journal, which was first published in 1948 at the mid-point in Jean Genet’s career, stands between his earlier works of fiction and his later works of drama, and points in both directions. It is a long meditation on “betrayal, theft and homosexuality,” that is to say on Genet’s …

An Ideal Critic

The Living Novel and Later Appreciations

by V.S. Pritchett
The publication of a new collection of essays by V. S. Pritchett serves as a reminder of the degree to which educated readers are in his debt. The present volume combines a welcome reprinting of the thirty-odd essays of The Living Novel, first published in 1947, to which the author …

The Poetry of Madness

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti

by Milton Rokeach
In July, 1959, Dr. Milton Rokeach, a social psychologist and Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University, entered the Ypsilanti State Hospital to begin a research project. He took along with him a group of assistants and a tape recorder. In Ward D-23 of the hospital were gathered three men, …