Todd Gitlin is a professor of journalism and sociology at Columbia University. In 1963 and 1964, he was president of Students for a Democratic Society. He is the author of numerous books, including The Whole World is Watching: Mass Media in the Making and Unmaking of the Left (1980), The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage (1987), The Intellectuals and the Flag (2006), and, most recently, Occupy Nation: The Roots, the Spirit, and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street (2012). (May 2018)

Follow Todd Gitlin on Twitter: @toddgitlin.

NYR DAILY

1968: Year of Counter-Revolution

Associates of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the slain civil rights leader lying on the motel balcony, pointing in the direction of the assassin, Memphis, Tennessee, April 4, 1968

The familiar collages of 1968’s collisions do evoke the churning surfaces of events, reproducing the uncanny, off-balance feeling of 1968. But they fail to illuminate the meaning of events. If the texture of 1968 was chaos, underneath was a structure that today can be—and needs to be—seen more clearly. The left was wildly guilty of misrecognition. What haunted America was not the misty specter of revolution but the solidifying specter of reaction.