Contents


Engines of Mischief: The Best Children’s Books of 1964

Wally the Wordworm by Clifton Fadiman

The Untold Adventures of Santa Claus by Ogden Nash

How to Catch a Crocodile by Robert Pack

How the Whale Became by Ted Hughes

Squawky by Stephen Potter

Tom and Tabby by John Symonds

Elisabeth the Cow Ghost by William Pène du Bois

The Young Man Who Wouldn’t Hoe Corn by Eric von Schmidt

The King Who Loved Candy by Peter Hughes

Meeting with a Stranger by Duane Bradley

The Takula Tree by Elizabeth P. Fleming

Children of Africa by Louise A. Stinetorf

The Letter on the Tree by Natalie Savage Carlson

A Day Without Wind by William Mayne

The Coriander by Eilis Dillon

The Alley by Eleanor Estes

Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

I Go by Sea, I Go by Land by P.L. Travers

Knights Beseiged by Nancy Faulkner

Save the Khan by B. Bartos-Höppner

The Burning of Njal by Henry Treece

The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander

To Catch a Spy by Amelia Elizabeth Walden

Oz Country

The Machine in the Garden: Technology and the Pastoral by Leo Marx

The Wizard of Oz and Who He Was edited with two introductory essays by Martin Gardner, by Russell B. Nye

Throwing up Absurd

Last Exit To Brooklyn by Hubert Selby Jr.

Nova Express by William S. Burroughs

The Invention of Morel (and other stories from La Trama Celeste) by Adolfo Bioy Casares

Us He Devours by James B. Hall

Contributors

Janet Adam Smith (1905–1999) was a Scottish writer and critic. Educated at Oxford, she worked as an editor at a number of literary publications, including The Listener, The Criterion and New Statesman. She also edited the Faber Book of Modern Verse and its companion volume, the Faber Book of Children’s Verse. An accomplished mountaineer, Smith wrote about her adventures in Mountain Holidays; her other books include Life Among the Scots and John Buchnan and His World.

Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Marius Bewley (1916–1973) was a British-American literary critic. Educated at Cambridge, Bewley taught English literature at Rutgers and was an advisory editor atThe Hudson Review.

Frederick C. Crews is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Follies of the Wise: Dissenting Essays.

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at Oxford. His most recent book is History in the Making.

Paul Goodman (1911–1972) was an American social critic, psychologist, poet, novelist, and anarchist. His writings appeared in Politics, Partisan Review, The New Republic, Commentary, The New Leader, Dissent, and The New York Review of Books. He published several well-regarded books in a variety of fields—including city planning, Gestalt therapy, literary criticism, and politics—before Growing Up Absurd, cancelled by its original publisher and turned down by a number of other presses, was brought out by Random House in 1960.

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Francis Haskell (1928-2000) was an English art historian. His works include Patrons and Painters: Art and Society in Baroque Italyand History and its Images: Art and the Interpretation of the Past. Haskell taught at Oxford.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

Hans J. Morgenthau (1904–1980) was a legal scholar and theorist of international relations. Educated in Germany and Switzerland, Morgenthau taught for many years at the University of Chicago; later in life, he moved to The New School and The City University of New York. His books include In Defense of The National Interest, Politics Among Nations, and The Purpose of American Politics.

J.H. Plumb (1911–2001) was a British historian. He taught at Cambridge and Columbia. Plumb was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1968 and was knighted in 1982. His works include England in the Eighteenth Century, The Making of a Historian,and The American Experience.

John Richardson’s A Life of Picasso, Volume Three, was published in 2007. Volume One won the Whitbread Prize in England in 1991.

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.