Contents


The Genius of Isaac Bashevis Singer

Satan In Goray by Isaac Bashevis Singer

The Family Moskat by Isaac Bashevis Singer

The Magician of Lublin by Isaac Bashevis Singer

The Slave by Isaac Bashevis Singer

Gimpel The Fool by Isaac Bashevis Singer

The Spinoza of Market Street: by Isaac Bashevis Singer

Short Friday by Isaac Bashevis Singer

Deep Frye

A Natural Perspective: The Development of Shakespearean Comedy and Romance by Northrop Frye

New Fiction

The Orgy by Muriel Rukeyser

On the Darkening Green by Jerome Charyn

The Father and Other Stories by R.V. Cassill

The Rich Pay Late by Simon Raven

The Day the Call Came by Thomas Hinde

Contributors

E. J. Hobsbawm (1917–2012) was a British historian. Born in Egypt, he was educated at Cambridge; he taught at Birkbeck College and The New School. His works include The Age of Extremes; Globalisation, Democracy and Terrorism; and On Empire.

Ted Hughes’s translation of Racine’s Phèdre will be staged at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in January and published that month. His translation of the complete Oresteia, of which the poem in this issue is the opening, will be staged by the National Theatre in England and published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in June. His last book was Birthday Letters. He died on October 28. (December 1998)

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

I.F. Stone (1907–1989) was an American journalist and publisher whose self-published newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly, challenged the conservatism of American journalism in the midcentury. A Noncomformist History of Our Times (1989) is a six-volume anthology of Stone’s writings.

Virgil Thomson (1896–1989) was a composer and critic. He collaborated extensively with Gertrude Stein, who wrote the libretti for his operas Four Saints in Three Actsand The Mother of Us All. In 1988 he was awarded the National Medal of Arts.

Stephen Toulmin (1922–2009) was a British philosopher. First outlined in The Uses of Argument, his model for analyzing arguments has had a lasting influence on fields as diverse as law, computer science and communications theory. Toulmin’s other works include The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning and Return to Reason.