Contents


The Viennese Muses

The Letters of Mozart and His Family edited by Emily Anderson, Second edition prepared by A. Hyatt King, by Monica Carolan

What Is History?

Shapes of Philosophical History by Frank E. Manuel

The Prophets of Paris by Frank E. Manuel

Utopias and Utopian Thought edited by Frank E. Manuel

The Riddle of History: The Great Speculators From Vico to Freud by Bruce Mazlish

The Unique and the Universal by J.L. Talmon

Inscapist

The Journal of Beatrix Potter from 1881 to 1897 transcribed from her code writing by Leslie Linder

Serious Ladies

Dark Places of the Heart by Christina Stead

The Collected Works of Jane Bowles by Jane Bowles, introduction by Truman Capote

Journal from Ellipsia by Hortense Calisher

Contributors

Janet Adam Smith (1905–1999) was a Scottish writer and critic. Educated at Oxford, she worked as an editor at a number of literary publications, including The Listener, The Criterion and New Statesman. She also edited the Faber Book of Modern Verse and its companion volume, the Faber Book of Children’s Verse. An accomplished mountaineer, Smith wrote about her adventures in Mountain Holidays; her other books include Life Among the Scots and John Buchnan and His World.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Edmund R. Leach (1910–1989) was a British anthropologist. He is widely credited with introducing Anglophone readers to the work of Claude Lévi-Strauss. Leach served as provost of King’s College, Cambridge from 1966 until 1979; he was made a Fellow of the British Academy in 1972 and knighted in 1975. A two-volume selection of his writings, The Essential Edmund Leach, was published by Yale University Press in 2001.