Contents


The Brother of Us All

Rimbaud: Complete Works, Selected Letters Introduction, Prose Translations, and Notes by Wallace Fowlie

Rimbaud: A Critical Study by Wallace Fowlie

An Open Secret

The Reactionaries: Yeats, Lewis, Pound, Eliot, Lawrence: A Study of the Anti-Democratic Intelligentsia by John R. Harrison, Introduction by William Empson

Chronicles of the Holocaust

Treblinka by Jean-François Steiner, Preface by Simone de Beauvoir

The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski

They Fought Back: The Story of the Jewish Resistance in Nazi Europe edited and translated by Yuri Suhl

Resistance Against Tyranny edited by Eugene Heimler

The Murderers Among Us: The Wiesenthal Memoirs by Simon Wiesenthal, edited by Joseph Wechsberg

1848 and All That

1848: The Opening of an Era edited by F. Fejtö, Introduction by A.J.P. Taylor

1848: The Making of a Revolution by Georges Duveau, Introduction by Georges Rudé

Contributors

Andrew Kopkind (1935–1994) was a journalist and editor. Kopkind’s work chronicled the turbulence of the American sixties and seventies; he wrote on the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War era, and the rise of Ronald Regan in Time Magazine, The Nation, and The New Republic, where he served as associate editor. An anthology of his work, The Thirty Years’ Wars: Dispatches and Diversions of a Radical Journalist, 1965-1994, was published in 1995.

Philip Rahv (1908–1973) was an American literary critic. Rahv was a founding editor of Partisan Review. His works include Image and Idea and Literature and the Sixth Sense.

Leonard Schapiro was a British political scientist and one of the world’s foremost experts on Soviet politics. His works include The Communist Party of the Soviet Union and Russian Studies; he also translated Turgenev’s novel Spring Torrentsinto English.

Paul Schmidt (1934-1999), translator, poet, actor, librettist, playwright, and essayist, was born in Brooklyn, the oldest of seven children. He received a degree from Colgate University in Russian studies in 1955 and, after a year of graduate work at Harvard, he moved to Paris, where he studied mime with Marcel Marceau and acting with Jacques Charon of the Comédie Française. Drafted in 1958, he served in the US Army Intelligence and on his release resumed his Russian studies; his doctoral thesis on “the stylized theater of V.E. Mejerxol’d” was published as Meyerhold at Work. For eleven years, Schmidt was a professor of Slavic languages at the University of Texas at Austin, where he won the Bromberg Award for Teaching Excellence. His Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works was published in 1975, and translations of Russian poets, notably Marina Tsvetaeva, followed. A commission from the Dia Foundation supported his translations of Velimir Khlebnikov (four volumes published between 1985 and 1997), allowing him to leave academia and move to New York City. Working with the Yale Repertory Theatre, the American Repertory Theatre, the Guthrie, and other companies, he translated Euripides, Chekhov, Brecht, Genet, Gogol, Marivaux, and Mayakovsky, and wrote three plays of his own, winning the Helen Hayes and Kesselring awards for best play for Black Sea Follies. Providing text and often performing, he collaborated with the Wooster Group and with the avant-garde directors Robert Wilson, JoAnne Akalaitis, David Schweitzer, and Peter Sellars. He also acted in film and television, and in the 1970s devised “The Lost Art of Melodeclamation,” a program of nineteenth-century works for voice and orchestra, which he toured and performed with the pianist Yvar Mikhashoff, who transposed the works for keyboard. The Plays of Anton Chekhov, Schmidt’s translation of twelve of Chekhov’s plays, was published in 1997. From 1993 until the end of his life, he taught translation and dramaturgy at the Yale School of Drama.

Roger Shattuck (1923–2005) was an American writer and scholar of French culture. He taught at Harvard, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Virginia, and Boston University, where he was named University Professor. His books includeForbidden Knowledge: From Prometheus to Pornography.