Contents


Reason and Revolution

Theory and Practice: History of a Concept from Aristotle to Marx by Nicholas Lobkowicz

The Evolution of Dialectical Materialism by Z.A. Jordan

The Social and Political Thought of Karl Marx by Shlomo Avineri

Not So Grand Guignol

A Change of Skin by Carlos Fuentes, translated by Sam Hileman

The Flood by J.M.G. LeClézio, translated by Peter Green

Terror on the Mountain by Charles F. Ramuz, translated by Milton Stansbury

Prop Art

Vanity of Duluoz by Jack Kerouac

The Answer by Jeremy Larner

In the Heart of the Heart of the Country by William H. Gass

Contributors

Bernard Bergonzi is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Warwick.

D.J. Enright (1920–2002) was a British poet, novelist and critic. He held teaching positions in Egypt, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and the United Kingdom. In 1981 Enright was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

William H. Gass (b. 1924) is an essayist, novelist, and literary critic. He grew up in Ohio and is a former professor of philosophy at Washington University. Among his books are six works of fiction and nine books of essays, including Tests of Time (2002), A Temple of Texts (2006), and Life Sentences (2012). New York Review Books will republish his story collection In the Heart of the Heart of the Country (1968) in 2014. Gass lives with his wife, the architect Mary Gass, in St. Louis.

George F. Kennan (1904–2005) was an American diplomat, political scientist and historian. He is best known for his role in shaping US foreign policy during the Cold War and, in particular, for the doctrine of containment. Kennan was Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton and served as Ambassador to the USSR in 1952 and as Ambassador to Yugoslavia from 1961 to 1963. His books include At a Century’s Ending and An American Family.

Andrew Kopkind (1935–1994) was a journalist and editor. Kopkind’s work chronicled the turbulence of the American sixties and seventies; he wrote on the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War era, and the rise of Ronald Regan in Time Magazine, The Nation, and The New Republic, where he served as associate editor. An anthology of his work, The Thirty Years’ Wars: Dispatches and Diversions of a Radical Journalist, 1965-1994, was published in 1995.

George Lichtheim (1912–1973) was a scholar of Marx and Marxism. Lichtheim was a regular contributor to The Review and a contributing editor of Commentary. His books include From Marx to Hegeland Europe in the Twentieth Century.

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.

Jack Richardson (1934–2012) was a playwright, novelist and drama critic. His 1960 play, The Prodigal, a retelling of Euripides’ Orestes, won an Obie Award and a Drama Desk Award. Richardson wrote dramatic criticism for The New York Times, Esquire and Commentary and was a frequent contributor to The Review.

Christopher Ricks teaches at Boston University in the Core Curriculum and the Editorial Institute and is a former president of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers. From 2004 to 2009 he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. His recent books include True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell Under the Sign of Eliot and Pound and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot.

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

John Thompson is an English sociologist. He has published several studies of the media and communication in modern societies, including The Media and Modernity: A Social Theory of the Mediaand Political Scandal: Power and Visibility in the Media Age.

Stephen Toulmin (1922–2009) was a British philosopher. First outlined in The Uses of Argument, his model for analyzing arguments has had a lasting influence on fields as diverse as law, computer science and communications theory. Toulmin’s other works include The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning and Return to Reason.