Contents


Birthday Party

Obsolete Communism: The Left-Wing Alternative by Daniel Cohn-Bendit

The French Student Revolt: The Leaders Speak by Daniel Cohn-Bendit, by Jean-Pierre Duteuil, by Alain Geismar, by Jacques Sauvageot. with an Interview with Daniel Cohn-Bendit by Jean-Paul Sartre

The Explosion: Marxism and the French Upheaval by Henri Lefebvre

Red Flag/Black Flag: French Revolution 1968 by Patrick Seale, by Maureen McConville

The Spirit of May by J.J. Servan-Schreiber

Le Mouvement de Mai ou le Communisme Utopique by Alain Touraine

L’Elysée en Péril by Philippe Alexandre

Second Thoughts

The World’s Body by John Crowe Ransom

John Crowe Ransom: Critical Essays and a Bibliography edited by Thomas Daniel Young

Essays of Four Decades by Allen Tate

The Fugitive Group: A Literary History by Louise Cowan

The Burden of Time: The Fugitives and Agrarians by John L. Stewart

Contributors

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


M. I. Finley (1912-1986), the son of Nathan Finkelstein and Anna Katzellenbogen, was born in New York City. He graduated from Syracuse University at the age of fifteen and received an MA in public law from Columbia, before turning to the study of ancient history. During the Thirties Finley taught at Columbia and City College and developed an interest in the sociology of the ancient world that was shaped in part by his association with members of the Frankfurt School who were working in exile in America. In 1952, when he was teaching at Rutgers, Finley was summoned before the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee and asked whether he had ever been a member of the Communist Party. He refused to answer, invoking the Fifth Amendment; by the end of the year he had been fired from the university by a unanimous vote of its trustees. Unable to find work in the US, Finley moved to England, where he taught for many years at Cambridge, helping to redirect the focus of classical education from a narrow emphasis on philology to a wider concern with culture, economics, and society. He became a British subject in 1962 and was knighted in 1979. Among Finley’s best-known works are The Ancient Economy, Ancient Slavery and Modern Ideology, and The World of Odysseus.

Paul Goodman (1911–1972) was an American social critic, psychologist, poet, novelist, and anarchist. His writings appeared in Politics, Partisan Review, The New Republic, Commentary, The New Leader, Dissent, and The New York Review of Books. He published several well-regarded books in a variety of fields—including city planning, Gestalt therapy, literary criticism, and politics—before Growing Up Absurd, cancelled by its original publisher and turned down by a number of other presses, was brought out by Random House in 1960.