Contents


Harvard on My Mind

The Harvard Strike by Lawrence E. Eichel and Kenneth W. Jost and Robert D. Luskin and Richard M. Neustadt

Push Comes to Shove by Steven Kelman

The Right to Say “We” by Richard Zorza

The Boys

Managing Mailer by Joe Flaherty

The Gang That Couldn’t Shoot Straight by Jimmy Breslin

Brain Storm

Mind and Brain: A Philosophy of Science by Arturo Rosenblueth

Physical Control of the Mind by Jose M.R. Delgado

Mind, Brain and Adaptation in the Nineteenth Century by Robert M. Young

Spices & Christians

Magellan’s Voyage by Antonio Pigafetta, translated and edited by R.A. Skelton

The Portuguese Seaborne Empire, 1415-1825 by C.R. Boxer

Contributors

F. W. Dupee was a literary critic and essayist. Dupee was a founding editor of The Partisan Review and literary editor of The New Masses. He taught at Bowdoin, Bard and Columbia.

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at ­Oxford. His books include Spain, Europe and the Wider World, 1500–1800 and ­History in the Making. (June 2016)

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916–2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

Hans J. Morgenthau (1904–1980) was a legal scholar and theorist of international relations. Educated in Germany and Switzerland, Morgenthau taught for many years at the University of Chicago; later in life, he moved to The New School and The City University of New York. His books include In Defense of The National Interest, Politics Among Nations, and The Purpose of American Politics.