Contents


Dead Souls

Khrushchev Remembers translated and edited by Strobe Talbott, with an Introduction, Commentary, and Notes by Edward Crankshaw

From Peking to Rome

Madly Singing in the Mountains: An Appreciation and Anthology of Arthur Waley edited by Ivan Morris

Rebellion and Its Enemies in Late Imperial China: Militarization and Social Structure, 1796-1864 by Philip A. Kuhn

The Rise of Modern China by Immanuel C.Y. Hsü

The China Reader, Vol I, Imperial China by Franz Schurmann, by Orville Schell

The China Reader, Vol II, Republican China by Franz Schurmann, by Orville Schell

The China Reader, Vol III, Communist China by Franz Schurmann, by Orville Schell

The Religions of the Roman Empire by John Ferguson

Constantine by Ramsay MacMullen

Rome: The Center of Power by Ranuccio Bianchi Bandinelli

Slave Masters, Women & Northern Nationalists

Crisis of Fear: Secession in South Carolina by Stephen A. Channing

The Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1830-1930 by Anne Firor Scott

The Meaning of Henry Ward Beecher: An Essay on the Shifting Values of Mid-Victorian America, 1840-1870 by William G. McLoughlin

Contributors

Nancy Mitford (1904–1973) was born into the British aristocracy and, by her own account, brought up without an education, except in riding and French. She managed a London bookshop during the Second World War, then moved to Paris, where she began to write her celebrated and successful novels, among them The Pursuit of Love and Love in a Cold Climate, about the foibles of the English upper class. Mitford was also the author of four biographies: Madame de Pompadour (1954), Voltaire in Love (1957), The Sun King (1966), and Frederick the Great (1970)—all available as NYRB classics. In 1967 Mitford moved from Paris to Versailles, where she lived until her death from Hodgkin’s disease.

J.H. Plumb (1911–2001) was a British historian. He taught at Cambridge and Columbia. Plumb was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1968 and was knighted in 1982. His works include England in the Eighteenth Century, The Making of a Historian,and The American Experience.

Emma Rothschild is Director of the Joint Centre for History and Economics at King’s College, Cambridge and Harvard, and Professor of History at Harvard. She is the author of Economic Sentiments: Adam Smith, Condorcet and the Enlightenment.

Edmund Wilson (1895-1972) is widely regarded as the preeminent American man of letters of the twentieth century. Over his long career, he wrote for Vanity Fair, helped edit The New Republic, served as chief book critic for The New Yorker, and was a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Wilson was the author of more than twenty books, including Axel’s Castle, Patriotic Gore, and a work of fiction, Memoirs of Hecate County.