Contents


What a Problem!

Bittersweet Encounter: The Afro-American and the American Jew by Robert G. Weisbord and Arthur Stein

The Negroes and the Jews by Leonora E. Berson

No Name in the Street by James Baldwin

I Am a Novel

The Confession of a Child of the Century, by Samuel Heather by Thomas Rogers

End Zone by Don DeLillo

Eat of Me, I am the Savior by Arnold Kemp

Neither Marx nor Moses

Man on His Own: Essays in the Philosophy of Religion by Ernst Bloch, translated by E.B. Ashton

On Karl Marx by Ernst Bloch, translated by John Maxwell

Contributors

Clarence Brown is the author of a prize-winning biography of Mandelstam and is Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Princeton.

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Lincoln Kirstein (1907–1996) was a writer and ballet critic. In 1946, together with George Balanchine, Kirstein founded the Ballet Society, which would soon be renamed The New York City Ballet. In 1984 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

Roger Sale is a critic and journalist. Until 1999, he was Professor of English at the University of Washington. His books include Modern Heroism: Essays on D. H. Lawrence, William Empson and J.R.R. Tolkien and On Not Being Good Enough: Writings of a Working Critic.

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Ronald Steel is Professor of International Relations at the University of Southern California, a recent fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, and the author of biographies of Walter Lippmann and Robert Kennedy.

I.F. Stone (1907–1989) was an American journalist and publisher whose self-published newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly, challenged the conservatism of American journalism in the midcentury. A Noncomformist History of Our Times (1989) is a six-volume anthology of Stone’s writings.

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)

Nicholas von Hoffman is a columnist for The Huffington Post.