Contents


Attis Adonis Osiris Fitzgerald & Co.

Exiles from Paradise: Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald by Sara Mayfield

Dear Scott/Dear Max: the Fitzgerald-Perkins Correspondence edited by John Kuehl, edited by Jackson Bryer

Living Well Is the Best Revenge by Calvin Tomkins

The Golden Moment: The Novels of F. Scott Fitzgerald by Milton R. Stern

Crazy Sundays: F. Scott Fitzgerald in Hollywood by Aaron Latham

F. Scott Fitzgerald in His Own Time, a Miscellany edited by Matthew Bruccoli, edited by Jackson Bryer

Counter Revolutionaries

The Counter-Revolution, Doctrine and Action, 1789-1804 by Jacques Godechot, translated by Salvator Attanasio

Power, Property and History by Joseph Barnave, translated and edited by Emanuel Chill

History in Geographic Perspective: The Other France by E.W. Fox

Short Reviews

The Devil in the Fire: American Literature and Culture 1951-1971 by John W. Aldridge

Massacre of the Brazilian Indians by Lucien Bodard, translated by Jennifer Monaghan

Janis by David Dalton

Contributors

Martin Malia is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author, most recently, of Russia Under Western Eyes, from the Bronze Horseman to the Lenin Mausoleum. (November 2001)

Osip Mandelstam (1891–1938) was born and raised in St. Petersburg, where he attended the prestigious Tenishev School, before studying at the universities of St. Petersburg and Heidelberg and at the Sorbonne. Mandelstam first published his poems in Apollyon, an avant-garde magazine, in 1910, then banded together with Anna Akhmatova and Nicholas Gumilev to form the Acmeist group, which advocated an aesthetic of exact description and chiseled form, as suggested by the title of Mandelstam’s first book, Stone (1913). During the Russian Revolution, Mandelstam left Leningrad for the Crimea and Georgia, and he settled in Moscow in 1922, where his second collection of poems, Tristia, appeared. Unpopular with the Soviet authorities, Mandelstam found it increasingly difficult to publish his poetry, though an edition of collected poems did come out in 1928. In 1934, after reading an epigram denouncing Stalin to friends, Mandelstam was arrested and sent into exile. He wrote furiously during these years, and his wife, Nadezhda, memorized his work in case his notebooks were destroyed or lost. (Nadezhda Mandelstam’s extraordinary memoirs of life with her husband, Hope Against Hope and Hope Abandoned, published in the 1970s, later helped to bring Mandelstam a worldwide audience.)

Robert Mazzocco is an American poet and critic.

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.