Contents


The Real Thing

The Truth About Them by Jose Yglesias

The Room by Hubert Selby Jr.

The Book of Flights by J.M.G. Le Clézio, translated by Simon Watson Taylor

Natives of My Person by George Lamming

Victims

Children of Crisis: Volume II, Migrants, Sharecroppers and Mountaineers by Robert Coles

Children of Crisis: Volume III, The South Goes North by Robert Coles

The TV Racket

A Tower in Babel: A History of Broadcasting in the United States to 1933 by Erik Barnouw

The Golden Web: A History of Broadcasting in the United States, 1933-1953 by Erik Barnouw

The Image Empire: A History of Broadcasting in the United States from 1953 by Erik Barnouw

Televi$ion: The Business Behind the Box by Les Brown

Cable Television in the Cities: Community Control, Public Access, Minority Ownership The Television of Abundance, Report of the Sloan Commission on Cable Communications, McGraw-Hill, 256 pp., $2.95. The reviewer participated as a consultant in the rep edited by Charles Tate

Guerrilla Television by Michael Shamberg. and Raindance Corporation

Prisons: The Menace of Liberal Reform

Struggle for Justice: A Report on Crime and Punishment in America prepared for the American Friends Service Committee

Maximum Security: Letters from California’s Prisons edited by Eve Pell. and members of the Prison Law Project

Short Reviews

The Life of Benjamin Banneker by Silvio Bedini

Jazz Masters of the Thirties by Rex W. Stewart

Right to Challenge: People and Power in the Steelworkers Union by John Herling

War Comes to Long An: Revolutionary Conflict in a Vietnamese Province by Jeffrey Race

Contributors

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) was a novelist, essayist, and critic. Her political and social commentary, literary essays, and drama criticism appeared in magazines such as Partisan Review, The New Yorker, Harper’s, and The New York Review of Books, and were collected in On the Contrary (1961), Mary McCarthy’s Theatre Chronicles 1937-1962 (1963), The Writing on the Wall (1970), Ideas and the Novel (1980), and Occasional Prose (1985). Her novels include The Company She Keeps (1942), The Oasis (1949), The Groves of Academe (1952), A Charmed Life (1955), The Group (1963), Birds of America (1971), and Cannibals and Missionaries (1979). She was the author of three works of autobiography, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood (1957), How I Grew (1987), and the unfinished Intellectual Memoirs (1992), and two travel books about Italy, Venice Observed (1956) and The Stones of Florence (1959). Her essays on the Vietnam War were collected in The Seventeenth Degree (1974); her essays on Watergate were collected in The Mask of State (1974).

Jessica Mitford (1917–1996) was the daughter of Lord and Lady Redesdale, and she and her five sisters and one brother grew up in isolation on their parents’ Cotswold estate. Rebelling against her family’s hidebound conservatism, Mitford became an outspoken socialist and, with her second cousin and husband-to-be Esmond Romilly, ran away to fight against Franco in the Spanish Civil War. Romilly was killed in World War II, and Mitford moved to America, where she married the lawyer and political activist Robert Treuhaft. A brilliant muckraking journalist, Mitford was the author of, among other works, a memoir of her youth, Hons and Rebels (also published as an NYRB Classic); a study of the funeral industry, The American Way of Death; and Kind and Usual Punishment: The Prison Business. She died at the age of seventy-eight while working on a follow-up to The American Way of Death, for which, with characteristic humor, she proposed the title “Death Warmed Over.”

Christopher Ricks teaches at Boston University in the Core Curriculum and the Editorial Institute and is a former president of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers. From 2004 to 2009 he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. His recent books include True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell Under the Sign of Eliot and Pound and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot.

I.F. Stone (1907–1989) was an American journalist and publisher whose self-published newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly, challenged the conservatism of American journalism in the midcentury. A Noncomformist History of Our Times (1989) is a six-volume anthology of Stone’s writings.