Contents


Tough Queen

Queen Victoria: From Her Birth to the Death of the Prince Consort by Cecil Woodham-Smith

Queen Victoria’s Little Wars by Byron Farwell

Victoria and the Victorians by Herbert Tingsten

Victoria’s Heyday by J.B. Priestley

The Outlaw

Land Without Justice by Milovan Djilas, translated by Michael D. Petrovich

The Stone and the Violets by Milovan Djilas, translated by Lovett F. Edwards

Contemporary Yugoslav Literature by Sveta Lukić

Trilling, Roszak, & Goodman

Mind in the Modern World by Lionel Trilling

Where the Wasteland Ends: Politics and Transcendence in Postindustrial Society by Theodore Roszak

Little Prayers and Finite Experience by Paul Goodman

W.E.B. DuBois and Black History

His Day Is Marching On: A Memoir of W. E. B. DuBois by Shirley Graham DuBois

The Seventh Son: The Thoughts and Writings of W. E. B. DuBois edited and with an introduction by Julius Lester

W. E. B. DuBois: A Profile edited by Rayford W. Logan

The Black Titan: An Anthology by the Editors of Freedomways

The Ranters

The World Turned Upside Down: Radical Ideas During the English Revolution by Christopher Hill

Anti-Climax

The Nature and Evolution of Female Sexuality by Mary Jane Sherfey MD.

The Female Orgasm: Psychology, Physiology, Fantasy by Seymour Fisher

Object Lessons

The Voice of Things by Francis Ponge, translated by Beth Archer Brombert

Things by Francis Ponge, translated and selected by Cid Corman

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


W.H. Auden (1907–1973) was an English poet, playwright, and essayist who lived and worked in the United States for much of the second half of his life. His work, from his early strictly metered verse, and plays written in collaboration with Christopher Isherwood, to his later dense poems and penetrating essays, represents one of the major achievements of twentieth-century literature.

Harold Cruse (1916-2005) was born in Petersburg, Virginia, the son of a railway porter. He was raised from a young age in New York City, where he attended high school, after which he served with the Army in Europe during World War II. Cruse attended the City College of New York, although he did not graduate, and was a member of the Communist Party for several years. He also wrote a number of plays and, in the 1960s, was co-founder with LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka) of the Black Arts Theater and School in Harlem. After publishing The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual in 1967, Cruse was invited to lecture at the University of Michigan, where he taught in the African-American studies program until his retirement as professor emeritus in the mid-1980s. Harold Cruse was also the author of Rebellion or Revolution?, Plural But Equal: A Critical Study of Blacks and Minorities and America’s Plural Society, and The Essential Harold Cruse: A Reader.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916-2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.