Contents


Freak Show

Walker Evans introduction by John Szarkowski

Diane Arbus edited and designed by Doon Arbus, by Marvin Israel

Warped Innocence

Behind the Door by Giorgio Bassani

The Garden of the Finzi-Continis by Giorgio Bassani

Five Stories of Ferrara by Giorgio Bassani

The Heron by Giorgio Bassani

Carnival in Caracas

The Politics of the Barrios of Venezuela by Talton F. Ray

Conflict and Political Change in Venezuela by Daniel H. Levine

Political Mobilization of the Venezuelan Peasant by John Duncan Powell

¿Socialismo para Venezuela? by Teodoro Petkoff

Petroleo y Dependencia by Juan Pablo Pérez Alfonzo

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas. Born in Riga, he moved in 1917 with his family to Petrograd, where he witnessed the Russian Revolution. In 1921 he emigrated to England. He was educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and became a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, where he was later appointed Professor of Social and Political Theory. He served as the first president of Wolfson College, Oxford, and as president of the British Academy.

Richard Ellmann (1918–1987) was an American critic and biographer. He taught at Northwestern, Oxford and Emory, where he was named Robert W. Professor in 1980. He won the National Book Award for Nonfiction for James Joycein 1959; a revised edition was awarded the James Tate Black Memorial Prize in 1982.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

P.D. Medawar (1915–1987) was a British biologist whose research was fundamental to the development of tissue and organ transplants. Along with Frank Macfarlane Burnet, he was awarded the 1960 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.