Contents


Notes from Valhalla

Cosima Wagner’s Diaries: Volume 1, 1869-1877 edited by Martin Gregor-Dellin and Dietrich Mack, translated with an introduction by Geoffrey Skelton

Ladies in Distress

Excellent Women by Barbara Pym

Quartet in Autumn by Barbara Pym

The Bad Sister by Emma Tennant

Great Granny Webster by Caroline Blackwood

The Struggle for the Third World

The Future of the World Economy by Wassily Leontief

The Evolution of the International Economic Order by W. Arthur Lewis

Rich and Poor Nations in the World Economy by Albert Fishlow and Carlos Díaz-Alejandro and Richard R. Fagen and Rogert D. Hansen

Short Reviews

A Just Measure of Pain: The Penitentiary in the Industrial Revolution 1750-1850 by Michael Ignatieff

Elusive Victory: The Arab-Israeli Wars, 1947-1974 by Trevor N. Dupuy

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Geoffrey Barraclough (1908–1984) was a British historian.

Sybille Bedford (1911–2006) was born Sybille von Schoenebeck in Charlottenburg, Germany, to an aristocratic German father and a partly Jewish, British-born mother. Raised variously in Germany, Italy, France, and England, she lived with her mother and Italian stepfather after her father’s death when she was seven, and was educated privately. Encouraged by Aldous Huxley, Bedford began writing fiction at the age of sixteen and went on to publish four novels, all influenced by her itinerant childhood among the European aristocracy: A Legacy (1956), A Favourite of the Gods (1963), A Compass Error (1968), and Jigsaw (1989, short-listed for the Booker Prize). She married Walter Bedford in 1935 and lived briefly in America during World War II, before returning to England. She was a prolific travel writer, the author of a two-volume biography of her friend Aldous Huxley, and a legal journalist, covering nearly one hundred trials. In 1981 she was awarded the Order of the British Empire.

George M. Fredrickson is Edgar E. Robinson Professor of US History Emeritus at Stanford. His recent books include Racism: A Short History and Not Just Black and White, a collection co-edited with Nancy Foner.

Stanley Hoffmann (1928-2015) was the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Karl Miller is a British editor and critic. In 1979 he founded the London Review of Books.

Robert Penn Warren (1936–2011) was an American novelist, poet and critic. From 1944 until 1945 he served as Consultant in Poetry—the position would later become Poet Laureate—to the Library of Congress.

Wilfrid Sheed (1915–2011) was a British-American novelist and critic.

Robert Towers (1923–1995) was an American critic and novelist. Born in Virginia, Towers was educated at Princeton and served for two years as Vice Counsel at the American Consulate General in Calcutta before dedicating himself to literary studies. He taught English literature and creative writing at Princeton, Queens College and Columbia.