Contents


The Wars of D.H. Lawrence

The Letters of D.H. Lawrence Volume 1: September 1901-May 1913 edited by James T. Boulton

D.H. Lawrence’s Nightmare: The Writer and His Circle in the Years of the Great War by Paul Delany

Lives and Letters: A.R. Orage, Beatrice Hastings, Katherine Mansfield, John Middleton Murry, and S.S. Koteliansky, 1906-1957 by John Carswell

High Spirits

Thomas Merton: Monk and Poet by George Woodcock

The Seven Storey Mountain by Thomas Merton

Love and Living by Thomas Merton, edited by Naomi Burton Stone, by Patrick Hart

The Heavy Fantastic

The Language of the Night: Essays on Fantasy and Science Fiction by Ursula K. LeGuin, edited and with introductions by Susan Wood

Fantastic Worlds: Myths, Tales and Stories edited and with commentaries by Eric S. Rabkin

The Virtues of Plato

Plato: The Written and Unwritten Doctrines by J.N. Findlay

Plato and Platonism: An Introduction by J.N. Findlay

Plato’s Moral Theory: The Early and Middle Dialogues by Terence Irwin

Contributors

Joseph Brodsky (1940–1996) was a Russian poet and essayist. Born in Leningrad, Brodsky moved to the United States when he was exiled from Russia in 1972. His poetry collections include A Part of Speech andTo Urania; his essay collections include Less Than One, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Watermark. In 1987, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. He served as US Poet Laureate from 1991 to 1992.

M.F. Burnyeat is Senior Research Fellow in Philosophy at All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author of The Theaetetus of Plato and A Map of Metaphysics Zeta. (November 2001)

Owen Chadwick is the former Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge and the author of The Reformation, The Victorian Church, The Secularization of the European Mind in the Nineteenth Century, and The Popes and European Revolution. (March 2002)

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

D.J. Enright (1920–2002) was a British poet, novelist and critic. He held teaching positions in Egypt, Japan, Thailand, Singapore and the United Kingdom. In 1981 Enright was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a Canadian economist and politician. He taught at Princeton and Harvard. His works include The Affluent Society, The Age of Uncertainty and Economics and the Public Purpose. Galbraith’s many honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Lomonosov Gold Medal, the Order of Canada, and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian award.

Ernst Gombrich (1909–2001) was an Austrian art historian. Born in Vienna, Gombrich studied at the Theresianum and then at the University of Vienna under Julius von Schlosser. After graduating, he worked as a Research Assistant and collaborator with the museum curator and Freudian analyst Ernst Kris. He joined the Warburg Institute in London as a Research Assistant in 1936 and was named Director in 1959. His major works include The Story of Art, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation, Aby Warburg: An Intellectual Biography, The Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art.

Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His most recent book is The Hellenistic Age: A Short History. (April 2014)

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Seamus Heaney’s first poetry collection, Death of a Naturalist, appeared forty years ago. Since then he has published poetry, criticism, and translations that have established him as one of the leading poets of his generation. In 1995 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

John Hollander is Sterling Professor Emeritus of English at Yale.

Conor Cruise O’Brien (1917–2009) was an Irish historian and politician. He was elected to the Irish parliament in 1969 and served as a Minister from 1973 until 1977. His works include States of Ireland, The Great Melody and Memoir: My Life and Themes.

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.

A.J.P. Taylor (1906–1990) was a British diplomatic historian.

Henri Zerner, Professor of History of Art and Architecture at Harvard, is the author of Renaissance Art in France: The Invention of Classicism and Écrire l’histoire de l’art: Figures d’une discipline.

Nicholas von Hoffman is a columnist for The Huffington Post.