Contents


The Brave

Self-Portrait of a Hero: The Letters of Jonathan Netanyahu, 1963-1976 with notes and an afterword by Benjamin Netanyahu and Iddo Netanyahu

What ‘R.’ Wrought

The Diary of Richard Wagner The Brown Book: 1865-1882 presented and annotated by Joachim Bergfeld, translated by George Bird

Cosima Wagner’s Diaries Vol. II: 1878-1883 additional notes by edited and annotated by Martin Gregor-Dellin and Dietrich Mack, translated, with an introduction, postscript, and Geoffrey Skelton

Cosima Wagner by George R. Marek

In Search of Wagner by Theodore Adorno, translated by Rodney Livingstone

The Dream of Self-Destruction: Wagner’s “Ring” and the Modern World by L.J. Rather

Bayreuth: The Early Years compiled, edited, and introduced by Robert Hartford

Tears on the Kimono

A Tale of Flowering Fortunes: Annals of Japanese Aristocratic Life in the Heian Period translated with an introduction and notes by William H. McCullough and Helen Craig McCullough

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

John K. Fairbank (1907–1991) was an American sinologist. His final book was China: A New History.

Stanley Hoffmann (1928-2015) was the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Alfred Kazin (1915–1998) was a writer and teacher. Among his books are On Native Grounds, a study of American literature from Howells to Faulkner, and the memoirs A Walker in the Cityand New York Jew. In 1996, he received the first Lifetime Award in Literary Criticism from the Truman Capote Literary Trust.

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Eugenio Montale was born in Genoa in 1896 and died in 1981. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1975. (November 2004)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Felix Rohatyn is an investment banker and has been a governor of the New York Stock Exchange, Chairman of the New York Municipal Assistance Corporation, and US Ambassador to France. (October 2008)

Quentin Skinner is Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities at Queen Mary, University of London. His latest book, Forensic Shakespeare, will be published later this year. (June 2014)