Contents


‘Red’ or ‘Expert’?

Education Under Mao: Class and Competition in Canton Schools, 1960-1980 by Jonathan Unger

Competitive Comrades: Career Incentives and Student Strategies in China by Susan L. Shirk

China’s Intellectual Dilemma: Politics and University Enrolment, 1949-1978 by Robert Taylor

Beautiful and Damned

Baudelaire the Damned: A Biography by F.W.J. Hemmings

Baudelaire’s Literary Criticism by Rosemary Lloyd

Les Fleurs du Mal by Charles Baudelaire, translated by Richard Howard

An Unwanted Civil War?

The Golden Age Restor’d: The Culture of the Stuart Court, 1603-42 by Graham Parry

The Outbreak of the English Civil War by Anthony Fletcher

The Royalist War Effort, 1642-1646 by Ronald Hutton

Marx in the Agora

The Class Struggle in the Ancient Greek World: From the Archaic Age to the Arab Conquests by G.E.M. de Ste. Croix

The Romantic Rationalist

Postscript to The Logic of Scientific Discovery by Karl R. Popper, edited by W.W. Bartley III

Karl Popper by Anthony O'Hear

In Pursuit of Truth: Essays on the Philosophy of Karl Popper on the Occasion of his Eightieth Birthday edited by Paul Levinson

Contributors

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Joan Didion is the author, most recently, of Blue Nights and The Year of Magical Thinking, among seven other works of nonfiction. Her five novels include A Book of Common Prayer and Democracy.
 (May 2016)

John K. Fairbank (1907–1991) was an American sinologist. His final book was China: A New History.

Ernst Gombrich (1909–2001) was an Austrian art historian. Born in Vienna, Gombrich studied at the Theresianum and then at the University of Vienna under Julius von Schlosser. After graduating, he worked as a Research Assistant and collaborator with the museum curator and Freudian analyst Ernst Kris. He joined the Warburg Institute in London as a Research Assistant in 1936 and was named Director in 1959. His major works include The Story of Art, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation, Aby Warburg: An Intellectual Biography, The Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art.

Elizabeth Hardwick (1916–2007) was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and educated at the University of Kentucky and Columbia University. A recipient of a Gold Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she is the author of three novels, a biography of Herman Melville, and four collections of essays. She was a co-founder and advisory editor of The New York Review of Books and contributed more than one hundred reviews, articles, reflections, and letters to the magazine. NYRB Classics publishes Sleepless Nights, a novel, and Seduction and Betrayal, a study of women in literature.

Jane Kramer writes for The New Yorker. Her books include Europeans and The Politics of Memory. (September 2013)

Jonathan Lieberson (1949–1989) was a philosopher, editor and critic. Lieberson taught at Barnard and Columbia. His book of essays, Varieties, included reflections on personalities as diverse as Diana Vreeland, Paul Valery and Clifford Geertz.

Osip Mandelstam (1891–1938) was persecuted for his poetry and died in a transit camp near Vladivostok, Russia. His poem in this issue is drawn from a new translation, Voronezh Notebooks, to be published by New York Review Books in January. (January 2016)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her latest book is The Ocean, the Bird, and the Scholar, a collection of her most recent essays. (October 2017)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)