Contents


From the House of Life

An Illustrated History of Interior Decoration: From Pompeii to Art Nouveau by Mario Praz, translated by William Weaver

Il mondo che ho visto by Mario Praz

What Was Fascism?

Who Were the Fascists: Social Roots of European Fascism edited by Stein Ugelvik Larsen, edited by Bernt Hagtvet, edited by Jan Petter Myklebust

Who Voted for Hitler? by Richard F. Hamilton

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Ernst Gombrich (1909–2001) was an Austrian art historian. Born in Vienna, Gombrich studied at the Theresianum and then at the University of Vienna under Julius von Schlosser. After graduating, he worked as a Research Assistant and collaborator with the museum curator and Freudian analyst Ernst Kris. He joined the Warburg Institute in London as a Research Assistant in 1936 and was named Director in 1959. His major works include The Story of Art, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation, Aby Warburg: An Intellectual Biography, The Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art.

Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Hugh Honour is the author, with John Fleming, of The Visual Arts: A History, which has recently been published in its sixth expanded edition. (November 2002)

Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is working on a book about the social and political consequences of growing inequality. (September 2007)

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.

Peter B. Reddaway is Professor Emeritus of Professor Emeritus of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University.

Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor at Harvard. He received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998. His most recent book is An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions, cowritten with Jean Drèze.
 (October 2013)

Lester Thurow is Professor of Economics and Management at MIT and the former Dean of the Sloan School of Management. He is the author of The Zero-Sum Society, Head to Head, and The Future of Capitalism. (February 1998)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her most recent book is Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.
 (June 2014)

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.