Contents


Verdi Victorious

The Works of Giuseppe Verdi edited by Philip Gossett

Rigoletto: Melodrama in Three Acts by Francesco Maria Piave, edited by Martin Chusid

The Humming Poet

The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Volume X, Companion edited by Robert Latham, by William Matthews, compiled and edited by Robert Latham

The Diary of Samuel Pepys, Volume XI, Index edited by Robert Latham, by William Matthews, compiled and edited by Robert Latham

Reagan: The Fruits of Success

The Reagan Presidency: An Early Assessment edited by Fred I. Greenstein

Gambling with History: Ronald Reagan in the White House by Laurence I. Barrett

Reagan’s Ruling Class: Portraits of the President’s Top One Hundred Officials by Ronald Brownstein, by Nina Easton

State of the Child

Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences by Howard Gardner

The Mental and Social Life of Babies: How Parents Create Persons by Kenneth Kaye

Siblings: Love, Envy and Understanding by Judy Dunn, by Carol Kendrick

The Erosion of Childhood by Valerie Polakow Suransky

Can Conservatism Work?

The Squandered Peace: The World, 1945-1975 by John Vaizey

Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Eighties by Paul Johnson

The British Political Tradition, Vol. I: The Rise of Collectivism by W.H. Greenleaf

The British Political Tradition, Vol. II: The Ideological Heritage by W.H. Greenleaf

Contributors

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Isaiah Berlin (1909–1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas. Born in Riga, he moved in 1917 with his family to Petrograd, where he witnessed the Russian Revolution. In 1921 he emigrated to England. He was educated at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and became a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, where he was later appointed Professor of Social and Political Theory. He served as the first president of Wolfson College, Oxford, and as president of the British Academy.

Jerome Bruner is University Professor at New York University. His newest book, Making Stories, appeared in the spring. (September 2003)

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

James Fallows is National Correspondent for The Atlantic.His books include Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel, Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq, and China Airborne.

Marshall Frady’s books include Wallace, Billy Graham, Southerners, Jesse: The Life and Pilgrimage of Jesse Jackson, and, most recently, Martin Luther King, Jr. He is currently writing a biography of Fidel Castro. (February 2004)

Robert Hughes (1938–2012) was an art critic and television writer. In the award-winning documentary series, The Shock of The New, Hughes recounted the development of modern art since the Impressionists; in The Fatal Shore, he explored the history of his native Australia. Hughes’s memoir, Things I Didn’t Know, was published in 2006.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) was a novelist, essayist, and critic. Her political and social commentary, literary essays, and drama criticism appeared in magazines such as Partisan Review, The New Yorker, Harper’s, and The New York Review of Books, and were collected in On the Contrary (1961), Mary McCarthy’s Theatre Chronicles 1937-1962 (1963), The Writing on the Wall (1970), Ideas and the Novel (1980), and Occasional Prose (1985). Her novels include The Company She Keeps (1942), The Oasis (1949), The Groves of Academe (1952), A Charmed Life (1955), The Group (1963), Birds of America (1971), and Cannibals and Missionaries (1979). She was the author of three works of autobiography, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood (1957), How I Grew (1987), and the unfinished Intellectual Memoirs (1992), and two travel books about Italy, Venice Observed (1956) and The Stones of Florence (1959). Her essays on the Vietnam War were collected in The Seventeenth Degree (1974); her essays on Watergate were collected in The Mask of State (1974).

James Merrill (1926–1995) was an American poet whose major work The Changing Light at Sandover describes a series of spirit communications conducted over many years. He won the National Book Award from his collections Nights and Days and Mirabell: Books of Number.

V.S. Pritchett (1900–1997) was a British essayist, novelist and short story writer. He worked as a foreign correspondent for the The Christian Science Monitorand as a literary critic forNew Statesman. In 1968 Pritchett was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire; he was knighted in 1975. His body of work includes many collections of short stories, in addition to travelogues, reviews, literary biographies and novels.

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

John R. Searle is Slusser Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is Making the Social World.
 (January 2013)

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.