Contents


General Keynes

The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes edited by Elizabeth Johnson, edited by Donald Moggridge

The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes, Vol. 19, Activities 1924–29 edited by Elizabeth Johnson, edited by Donald Moggridge

The Collected Writings of John Maynard Keynes, Vol. 7, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money edited by Elizabeth Johnson, edited by Donald Moggridge

Honest Floozies

Symphony for the Devil: The Rolling Stones Story by Philip Norman

Dance with the Devil: The Rolling Stones and Their Times by Stanley Booth

Dylan by Jonathan Cott

Kitsch and the Novel

Wild Berries by Yevgeny Yevtushenko, translated by Antonina W. Bouis

The Compromise by Sergei Dovlatov, translated by Anne Frydman

It’s Me, Eddie: A Fictional Memoir by Edward Limonov, translated by S.L. Campbell

The Island of Crimea by Vassily Aksyonov, translated by Michael Henry Heim

The Burn by Vassily Aksyonov, translated by Michael Glenny

The Long March

Civilization and Capitalism, 15th–18th Century. Volume 3: The Perspective of the World by Fernand Braudel, translated by Siân Reynolds

Field Marshal Stalin

The Road to Stalingrad Vol. 1, Stalin’s War with Germany by John Erickson

The Road to Berlin: Continuing the History of Stalin’s War with Germany by John Erickson

Contributors

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a Canadian economist and politician. He taught at Princeton and Harvard. His works include The Affluent Society, The Age of Uncertainty and Economics and the Public Purpose. Galbraith’s many honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Lomonosov Gold Medal, the Order of Canada, and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian award.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


James Joll (1936–2011) was a British historian. His books include The Origins of the First World War and Europe Since 1870.

Paul Schmidt (1934-1999), translator, poet, actor, librettist, playwright, and essayist, was born in Brooklyn, the oldest of seven children. He received a degree from Colgate University in Russian studies in 1955 and, after a year of graduate work at Harvard, he moved to Paris, where he studied mime with Marcel Marceau and acting with Jacques Charon of the Comédie Française. Drafted in 1958, he served in the US Army Intelligence and on his release resumed his Russian studies; his doctoral thesis on “the stylized theater of V.E. Mejerxol’d” was published as Meyerhold at Work. For eleven years, Schmidt was a professor of Slavic languages at the University of Texas at Austin, where he won the Bromberg Award for Teaching Excellence. His Arthur Rimbaud: Complete Works was published in 1975, and translations of Russian poets, notably Marina Tsvetaeva, followed. A commission from the Dia Foundation supported his translations of Velimir Khlebnikov (four volumes published between 1985 and 1997), allowing him to leave academia and move to New York City. Working with the Yale Repertory Theatre, the American Repertory Theatre, the Guthrie, and other companies, he translated Euripides, Chekhov, Brecht, Genet, Gogol, Marivaux, and Mayakovsky, and wrote three plays of his own, winning the Helen Hayes and Kesselring awards for best play for Black Sea Follies. Providing text and often performing, he collaborated with the Wooster Group and with the avant-garde directors Robert Wilson, JoAnne Akalaitis, David Schweitzer, and Peter Sellars. He also acted in film and television, and in the 1970s devised “The Lost Art of Melodeclamation,” a program of nineteenth-century works for voice and orchestra, which he toured and performed with the pianist Yvar Mikhashoff, who transposed the works for keyboard. The Plays of Anton Chekhov, Schmidt’s translation of twelve of Chekhov’s plays, was published in 1997. From 1993 until the end of his life, he taught translation and dramaturgy at the Yale School of Drama.

Charles Taylor was recently awarded the 2007 Templeton Prize. He is Professor of Law and Philosophy at Northwestern and Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Philosophy at McGill. His books include Hegel and The Ethics of Authenticity. (April 2007)

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.

James Wolcott is the cultural critic for Vanity Fair.