Contents


Chameleon

Ilya Ehrenburg: Revolutionary, Novelist, Poet, War Correspondent, Propagandist
The Extraordinary Epic of a Russian Survivor material by
by Anatol Goldberg, with an introduction, postscript, and additional Erik de Mauny

Good Witches

The Night Battles: Witchcraft and Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries by Carlo Ginzburg, translated by John Tedeschi and Anne Tedeschi

La sorcière de Jasmin by Emmanuel Le Roy Ladurie

The Case of the Crooked Bookman

An Enquiry into the Nature of Certain Nineteenth Century Pamphlets (2d Edition) by John Carter and Graham Pollard, edited by Nicolas Barker and John Collins

A Sequel to ‘An Enquiry’: The Forgeries of H. Buxton Forman and T.J. Wise Re-examined by Nicolas Barker and John Collins

‘Welfare’: The Future of an Illusion

The Economic Illusion: False Choices Between Prosperity and Social Justice by Robert Kuttner

Capitalism and the Welfare State: Dilemmas of Social Benevolence by Neil Gilbert

Kate Quinton’s Days by Susan Sheehan

Selective Nontreatment of Handicapped Newborns: Moral Dilemmas in Neonatal Medicine by Robert F. Weir

What Is a Wife Worth? by Michael H. Minton, with Jean Libman Block

Demographic and Socioeconomic Aspects of Aging in the United States Bureau of the Census, US Department of Commerce (Series P-23, No. 138)

Catholic Social Teaching and the US Economy US Bishops Ad Hoc Committee

Contributors

Edwin Frank is the editor of NYRB Classics. His Snake Train: Poems 1984–2013 will be published in early 2015.

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth and Other STEM ­Delusions, will appear next March.
 (July 2015)

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Brad Leithauser is a novelist, poet, and essayist. He lives in Massachusetts.

Janet Malcolm’s latest book is Forty-one False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers. Her next essay collection, Nobody’s Looking at You, will be published next year. (July 2018)

Conor Cruise O’Brien (1917–2009) was an Irish historian and politician. He was elected to the Irish parliament in 1969 and served as a Minister from 1973 until 1977. His works include States of Ireland, The Great Melody and Memoir: My Life and Themes.

Christopher Ricks teaches at Boston University in the Core Curriculum and the Editorial Institute and is a former president of the Association of Literary Scholars, Critics, and Writers. From 2004 to 2009 he was Professor of Poetry at the University of Oxford. His recent books include True Friendship: Geoffrey Hill, Anthony Hecht, and Robert Lowell Under the Sign of Eliot and Pound and Decisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot.

Oliver Sacks (1933–2015) was a physician and the author of over ten books, the most recent of which is On the Move: A Life.

Michael Scammell is the author of biographies of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Arthur Koestler, and has translated many books from Russian. He is now working on a memoir. (April 2016)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His most recent book is On Empson.

Gordon Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor Emeritus at Brown. His new book, Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, will be published in the fall.
 (May 2017)