Contents


Japanese Lib

The Issue of War: States, Societies, and the Far Eastern Conflict of 1941–1945 by Christopher Thorne

The Mind on Sex

The Use of Pleasure: Volume II of The History of Sexuality by Michel Foucault, translated by Robert Hurley

Street Moves

The Dancer and the Dance: Merce Cunningham in Conversation with Jacqueline Lesschaeve

Merce Cunningham Dance Company November 30–December 6, 1985, Joyce Theater, New York

Merce Cunningham Dance Company March 5–17, 1985 New York City Center

Contributors

Robert M. Adams (1915-1996) was a founding editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature. He taught at the University of Wisconsin, Rutgers, Cornell and U.C.L.A. His scholarly interested ranged from Milton to Joyce, and his translations of many classic works of French literature continue to be read to this day.

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Alfred Kazin (1915–1998) was a writer and teacher. Among his books are On Native Grounds, a study of American literature from Howells to Faulkner, and the memoirs A Walker in the Cityand New York Jew. In 1996, he received the first Lifetime Award in Literary Criticism from the Truman Capote Literary Trust.

Charles Rycroft (1914–1998) was a British psychoanalyst and writer. His books include A Critical Dictionary of Psychoanalysis, Anxiety and Neurosis, The Innocence of Dreams, and Psychoanalysis and Beyond.

H. R. Trevor-Roper (1914–2003) was a British historian and the author of The Last Days of Hitler. He taught at Oxford, where he was the Regius Professor Modern History.

Bertram Wyatt-Brown is Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History at the University of Florida. His most recent books are The Shaping of Southern Culture: Honor, Grace, and War and the forthcoming Hearts of Darkness: Wellsprings of a Southern Literary Tradition. (October 2002)