Contents


Jupiter’s Boy

Cellini by John Pope-Hennessy, principal photography by David Finn, additional photography by Takashi Okamura. others

Ganymede in the Renaissance: Homosexuality in Art and Society by James M. Saslow

The New Romantics

Equal Distance by Brad Leithauser

Ransom by Jay McInerney

Family Dancing by David Leavitt

Less Than Zero by Bret Easton Ellis

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Noel Annan (1916–2000) was a British military intelligence officer and scholar of European history. His works include Leslie Stephen and Our Age, Changing Enemies: The Defeat and Regeneration of Germany, and The Curious Strength of Positivism in English Political Thought.

Ian Buruma is currently Paul R. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College. His previous books include Year Zero: A History of 1945, Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents, and Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies. He writes frequently for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and the Financial Times. In Spring 2015, NYRB will reissue his book The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Japan and Germany.

Frederick C. Crews is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Follies of the Wise: Dissenting Essays.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Charles Hope was Director of the Warburg Institute, London, from 2001 to 2010. He is the author of Titian.


Alfred Kazin (1915–1998) was a writer and teacher. Among his books are On Native Grounds, a study of American literature from Howells to Faulkner, and the memoirs A Walker in the Cityand New York Jew. In 1996, he received the first Lifetime Award in Literary Criticism from the Truman Capote Literary Trust.

Leszek Kołakowski was professor of philosophy at the University of Warsaw until March 1968 when he was formally expelled for political reasons. He was later a Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. He was the author of several books, including Main Currents in Marxism. The article in this issue will appear in the collection of essays Is God Happy?, to be published in February by Basic Books. He died in 2009. (December 2012)

Edward Mortimer was until 2006 the Director of Communications in the Executive Office of the United Nations Secretary-General. He is a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, and Senior Vice President and Chief Program Officer at the Salzburg Global Seminar. (April 2008)

Aryeh Neier, former Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, is President of the Open Society Institute. He is the author of Taking Liberties: Four Decades in the Struggle for Rights.

Darryl Pinckney, a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He lives in New York City.

John Thompson is an English sociologist. He has published several studies of the media and communication in modern societies, including The Media and Modernity: A Social Theory of the Mediaand Political Scandal: Power and Visibility in the Media Age.