Contents


Not So Grand Strategy

Discriminate Deterrence: Report of the Commission on Integrated Long-Term Strategy co-chaired by Fred C. Iklé and Albert Wohlstetter

The Caruso of Jazz

Sidney Bechet: The Wizard of Jazz by John Chilton

Jazz Odyssey: The Autobiography of Joe Darensbourg as told to Peter Vacher

Big Shots

Trump: The Art of the Deal by Donald J. Trump and Tony Schwartz

Boone by T. Boone Pickens Jr.

Merger Mania: Arbitrage, Wall Street’s Best Kept Money-Making Secret by Ivan F. Boesky

Behind the Scenes: In Which the Author Talks About Ronald and Nancy Reagan…and Himself by Michael K. Deaver, with Mickey Herskowitz

Contributors

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a Canadian economist and politician. He taught at Princeton and Harvard. His works include The Affluent Society, The Age of Uncertainty and Economics and the Public Purpose. Galbraith’s many honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Lomonosov Gold Medal, the Order of Canada, and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian award.

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

E. J. Hobsbawm (1917–2012) was a British historian. Born in Egypt, he was educated at Cambridge; he taught at Birkbeck College and The New School. His works include The Age of Extremes; Globalisation, Democracy and Terrorism; and On Empire.

Stanley Hoffmann (1928-2015) was the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Paul Kennedy, the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Director of International Security Studies at Yale, is the author and editor of fifteen books, including The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. His latest book is The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. (November 2006)

Alison Lurie is the Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of ten novels, two collections of essays on children’s literature, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent book is Reading for Fun. (March 2017)

Michael Massing, a former executive editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, is the author of Fatal Discord: Erasmus, Luther, and the Fight for the Western Mind. (February 2018)

M. F. Perutz (1914–2002) was an Austrian molecular biologist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962. He is the author of Is Science Necessary?, Protein Structure, and I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier.

Felix Rohatyn is an investment banker and has been a governor of the New York Stock Exchange, Chairman of the New York Municipal Assistance Corporation, and US Ambassador to France. (October 2008)

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.