Contents


Heartsick

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez, translated by Edith Grossman

Breaking Up

House of Dreams: The Bingham Family of Louisville by Marie Brenner

The Binghams of Louisville: The Dark History Behind One of America’s Great Fortunes by David Leon Chandler, with Mary Voelz Chandler

The Art of War

The Military Revolution: Military Innovation and the Rise of the West, 1500–1800 by Geoffrey Parker

The Mask of Command by John Keegan

Strategy: The Logic of War and Peace by Edward N. Luttwak

Darwin Unbuttoned

Charles Darwin’s Notebooks, 1836–1844: Geology, Transmutation of Species, Metaphysical Enquiries transcribed and edited by Paul H. Barrett, by Peter J. Gautrey, by Sandra Herbert, by David Kohn, by Sydney Smith

The Correspondence of Charles Darwin Volume 3: 1844–1846 edited by Frederick Burkhardt, edited by Sydney Smith

History Turned Upside Down

Criticism and Compliment: The politics of literature in the England of Charles I by Kevin Sharpe

Feminist Milton by Joseph Wittreich

Puritan Legacies: Paradise Lost and the New England Tradition, 1630–1890 by Keith W.F. Stavely

The Origins of the English Novel, 1600–1740 by Michael McKeon

The Cultural Meaning of the Scientific Revolution by Margaret C. Jacob

Contributors

James Chace is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Government and Public Law at Bard College. He is the author of Acheson and, most recently, 1912: The Election That Changed the Country. He is now working on a biography of Lafayette. (October 2004)

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Christopher Hill (1912–2003) was an English historian. Educated at Oxford, Hill taught at the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire as well as Oxford, where he was elected Master of Balliol College. His books include Puritanism and Revolution,Intellectual Origins of the English Revolution, and The World Turned Upside Down.

Bernard Knox (1914–2010) was an English classicist. He was the first director of Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, DC. Among his many books are The Heroic Temper, The Oldest Dead White European Males, and Backing into the Future: The Classical Tradition and Its Renewal. He is the editor of The Norton Book of Classical Literature and wrote the introductions and notes for Robert Fagles’s translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey.

Nicholas Lemann is a Professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and a staff writer for The New Yorker.
 He is the author of The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy and The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America, among other books.

Bernard Lewis is Cleveland E. Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies Emeritus at Princeton. His most recent books are Music of a Distant Drum and What Went Wrong: Western Impact and Middle Eastern Response. (May 2002)

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her most recent book is Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.
 (June 2014)

Gore Vidal (1925–2012) was an American novelist, essayist, and playwright. His many works include the memoirs Point to Point Navigation and Palimpsest, the novels The City and the Pillar, Myra Breckinridge, and Lincoln, and the collection United States: Essays 1952–1992.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.