Contents


Is the World Getting Hotter?

The Potential Effects of Global Climate Change on the United States: Draft Report to Congress Printing Office in two volumes edited by Joel B. Smith, edited by Dennis A. Tirpak

State of the World 1988: A Worldwatch Institute Report on Progress Toward a Sustainable Society by Lester R. Brown, by William U. Chandler, by Alan Durning, by Christopher Flavin, by Lori Heise, by Jodi Jacobson, by Sandra Postel, by Cynthia Pollock Shea, by Linda Starke, by Edward C. Wolf

A Matter of Degrees: The Potential for Controlling the Greenhouse Effect by Irving M. Mintzer

The End by Larry Ephron

Prophet of Lubyanka

My Century: The Odyssey of a Polish Intellectual by Aleksander Wat, edited and translated by Richard Lourie, with a foreword by Czeslaw Milosz

Lost Worlds

Placeways: A Theory of the Human Environment by Eugene Victor Walter

The Architecture of Exile by Stanley Tigerman

The Idea of a Town: The Anthropology of Urban Form in Rome, Italy and the Ancient World by Joseph Rykwert

Thanks for the Memory

Les lieux de mémoire edited by Pierre Nora

Painting Politics for Louis-Philippe: Art and Ideology in Orléanist France, 1830–1848 by Michael Marrinan

Contributors

Ian Buruma is currently Paul R. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College. His previous books include Year Zero: A History of 1945, Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents, and Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies. He writes frequently for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and the Financial Times. In Spring 2015, NYRB will reissue his book The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Japan and Germany.

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

Francis Haskell (1928-2000) was an English art historian. His works include Patrons and Painters: Art and Society in Baroque Italyand History and its Images: Art and the Interpretation of the Past. Haskell taught at Oxford.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and of the forthcoming Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist.. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against natural gas fracking.

Julian Moynahan is Professor of English Emeritus at Rutgers University. His most recent book is Anglo-Irish: The Literary Imagination in a Hyphenated Culture. (May 2000)

Peter Partner’s books include Arab Voices and The Pope’s Men: The Papal Service in the Renaissance. His new book, God of Battles: Holy Wars of Christianity and Islam, has been published in the United Kingdom. (February 1998)

Peter B. Reddaway is Professor Emeritus of Professor Emeritus of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University.

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Aleksander Wat (1900-1967), the nom de plume of Aleksander Chwat, was born in Warsaw, the descendant of an old and distinguished Jewish family which counted among its members the great sixteenth-century cabalist Isaac Luria. He attended Warsaw University, where he studied philosophy, psychology, and logic, and formed strong ties with the literary avant-garde, publishing a first book of poems, Me from One Side and Me from the Other Side of My Pug Iron Stove, in 1920 and, some years later, a collection of stories entitled Lucifer Unemployed. Wat edited a variety of influential journals and helped to disseminate the work of Mayakovsky and the futurists in Poland, before forming an allegiance with the Communist Party and confining his writing to journalism. In 1939 he fled east before the advancing German army and was separated from his wife and young son. The family reunited in Lwów, then under Soviet control, where Wat found work on a newspaper, only to be placed under arrest. Imprisoned in the Soviet Union for the better part of two years, during which time he converted from Judaism to Christianity, Wat again rejoined his family, who had been exiled to Kazakhstan, in 1942. They returned after the war to Poland, where Wat began to write poetry again while serving as editor of the state publishing house. In 1963, he left his native country for France. Wat was invited in 1964 to the University of California, Berkeley, where he taped a series of conversations about his life and times with his countryman the poet Czeslaw Milosz. Edited by Milosz, these were published posthumously as My Century.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

C. Vann Woodward (1908–1999) was a historian of the American South. He taught at Johns Hopkins and at Yale, where he was named the Sterling Professor of History. His books include Mary Chesnut’s Civil War and The Old World’s New World.