Contents


La Forza del Destino

Memoirs of a Fortunate Jew: An Italian Story by Dan Vittorio Segre, translated by Dan Vittorio Segre

The Italians and the Holocaust: Persecution, Rescue, and Survival by Susan Zuccotti

Balanchine’s Steps

George Balanchine: Ballet Master by Richard Buckle, in collaboration with John Taras

Balletmaster: A Dancer’s View of George Balanchine by Moira Shearer

Dancing on My Grave by Gelsey Kirkland, by Greg Lawrence

Nuclear Wizards

Rabi: Scientist and Citizen by John S. Rigden

Toward a Livable World: Leo Szilard and the Crusade for Nuclear Arms Control edited by Helen S. Hawkins, edited by G. Allen Greb, edited by Gertrud Weiss Szilard

Better a Shield than a Sword: Perspectives on Defense and Technology by Edward Teller

The New Shakespeare?

Shakespearean Negotiations: The Circulation of Social Energy in Renaissance England by Stephen Greenblatt. (The New Historicism: Studies in Cultural Poetics, 4)

The Benefit of Slavery

Economic Growth and the Ending of the Transatlantic Slave Trade by David Eltis

Capitalism and Antislavery: British Mobilization in Comparative Perspective by Seymour Drescher

The Sense of Santayana

George Santayana by John McCormick

Persons and Places: Fragments of Autobiography by George Santayana, edited by William G. Holzberger, edited by Herman J. Saatkamp Jr., with an introduction by Richard C. Lyon

Contributors

Harold Bloom’s most recent books are The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible. He teaches at Yale and is at work on a play, To You Whoever You are: A Pageant Celebrating Walt Whitman.
 (February 2012)

M.F. Burnyeat is Senior Research Fellow in Philosophy at All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author of The Theaetetus of Plato and A Map of Metaphysics Zeta. (November 2001)

Robert Craft is a conductor and writer. Craft’s close working friendship with Igor Stravinsky is the subject of his memoir, An Improbable Life. In 2002 he was awarded the International Prix du Disque at the Cannes Music Festival.

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Thomas Flanagan (1923–2002), the grandson of Irish immigrants, grew up in Greenwich, Connecticut, where he ran the school newspaper with his friend Truman Capote. Flanagan attended Amherst College (with a two-year hiatus to serve in the Pacific Fleet) and earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he studied under Lionel Trilling while also writing stories for Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. In 1959, he published an important scholarly work, The Irish Novelists, 1800 to 1850, and the next year he moved to Berkeley, where he was to teach English and Irish literature at the University of California for many years. In 1978 he took up a post at the State University of New York at Stonybrook, from which he retired in 1996. Flanagan and his wife Jean made annual trips to Ireland, where he struck up friendships with many writers, including Benedict Kiely and Seamus Heaney, whom he in turn helped bring to the United States. His intimate knowledge of Ireland’s history and literature also helped to inspire his trilogy of historical novels, starting with The Year of the French (1979, winner of the National Critics’ Circle award for fiction) and continuing with The Tenants of Time (1988) and The End of the Hunt (1994). Flanagan was a frequent contributor to many publications, including The New York Review of Books, The New York Times, and The Kenyon Review. A collection of his essays, There You Are: Writing on Irish and American Literature and History, is also published by New York Review Books.