Contents


Precious Stones

Imperial Spoils: The Curious Case of the Elgin Marbles by Christopher Hitchens, with essays by Robert Browning and Graham Binns

The Elgins, 1766–1917: A Tale of Aristocrats, Proconsuls and Their Wives by Sydney Checkland

Democrats on the Take

Fluctuating Fortunes: The Political Power of Business in America by David Vogel

Honest Graft: Big Money and the American Political Process by Brooks Jackson

The Real Japan

The Enigma of Japanese Power: People and Politics in a Stateless Nation by Karel van Wolferen

Trading Places: How We Allowed Japan to Take the Lead by Clyde V. Prestowitz Jr.

Artemisia’s Revenge?

Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art by Mary D. Garrard

Pietro Testa, 1612–1650: Prints and Drawings (November–December 1988) by Elizabeth Cropper catalog of an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, with essays by Charles Dempsey and Francesco Solinas and Anna Nicolò and Francesca Consagra

Contributors

Shaul Bakhash is Robinson Professor of History at George Mason University and the author of The Reign of the Ayatollahs: Iran and the Islamic Revolution. (September 2005)

Frederick C. Crews’s new book, Freud: The Making of an Illusion, will be published in the fall.
 (February 2017)

James Fallows is National Correspondent for The Atlantic.His books include Free Flight: Inventing the Future of Travel, Blind into Baghdad: America’s War in Iraq, and China Airborne.

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Francis Haskell (1928-2000) was an English art historian. His works include Patrons and Painters: Art and Society in Baroque Italyand History and its Images: Art and the Interpretation of the Past. Haskell taught at Oxford.

Jeri Laber, Senior Advisor to Human Rights Watch, was formerly executive director of its Helsinki division. She is the author, with Barnett R. Rubin, of ‘A Nation is Dying’: Afghanistan Under the Soviets, 1979—1987. (January 1997)

Simon Leys (1935–2014) was the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian Na­tional University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys was a contributor to such publications as The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, and Le Figaro Littéraire, writing on literature and contemporary China. Among his books are Chinese Shadows, Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In addition to The Death of Napoleon NYRB publishes The Hall of Uselessness, a collection of essays, and On the Abolition of All Political Parties, an essay by Simone Weil that Leys translated and edited. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Fang Lizhi, an astrophysicist and former vice-president of the University of Science and Technology of China, was expelled from the Communist Party of China in 1987. He was granted asylum at the US embassy in Beijing before leaving the country in 1990. He is the 1989 recipient of the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award and is a professor of physics at the University of Arizona. (November 2011)

Roderick Macfarquhar is Leroy B. Williams Research Professor of History and Political Science at Harvard. His latest publication as editor and contributor is The Politics of China: Sixty Years of the People’s Republic of China. (June 2017)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His books include Sonata for Jukebox and Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.
 (September 2017)

Orville Schell is the former Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently the Arthur Ross Director of the Center on US–China Relations at the Asia Society in New York City, and the coauthor with John Delury of Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-First Century. (April 2016)

Robert Towers (1923–1995) was an American critic and novelist. Born in Virginia, Towers was educated at Princeton and served for two years as Vice Counsel at the American Consulate General in Calcutta before dedicating himself to literary studies. He taught English literature and creative writing at Princeton, Queens College and Columbia.

Bernard Williams (1929–2003) was Deutsch Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. His books include *Problems of the Self*, *Moral Luck*, *Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy*, and *Truth and Truthfulness*.