Contents


On the Bum

You Can’t Win: The Autobiography of Jack Black foreword by William S. Burroughs

Boxcar Bertha: An Autobiography as told to Dr. Ben L. Reitman, introduction by Kathy Acker, afterword by Roger A. Bruns

No Man’s Land

Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age by Modris Eksteins

The Lost Voices of World War I: An International Anthology of Writers, Poets and Playwrights edited by Tim Cross

Passion and Rebellion: The Expressionist Heritage edited by Stephen Eric Bronner, edited by Douglas Kellner

Frieden für Europa: Die Politik der Deutschen Reichstagsmehrheit 1917-18 by Wilhelm Ribhegge

German Liberalism and the Dissolution of the Weimar Party System, 1918-1933 by Larry Eugene Jones

Contributors

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Mary McCarthy (1912-1989) was a novelist, essayist, and critic. Her political and social commentary, literary essays, and drama criticism appeared in magazines such as Partisan Review, The New Yorker, Harper’s, and The New York Review of Books, and were collected in On the Contrary (1961), Mary McCarthy’s Theatre Chronicles 1937-1962 (1963), The Writing on the Wall (1970), Ideas and the Novel (1980), and Occasional Prose (1985). Her novels include The Company She Keeps (1942), The Oasis (1949), The Groves of Academe (1952), A Charmed Life (1955), The Group (1963), Birds of America (1971), and Cannibals and Missionaries (1979). She was the author of three works of autobiography, Memories of a Catholic Girlhood (1957), How I Grew (1987), and the unfinished Intellectual Memoirs (1992), and two travel books about Italy, Venice Observed (1956) and The Stones of Florence (1959). Her essays on the Vietnam War were collected in The Seventeenth Degree (1974); her essays on Watergate were collected in The Mask of State (1974).

Conor Cruise O’Brien (1917–2009) was an Irish historian and politician. He was elected to the Irish parliament in 1969 and served as a Minister from 1973 until 1977. His works include States of Ireland, The Great Melody and Memoir: My Life and Themes.

Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor of Social Sciences Emeritus at Columbia and a former president of the Linnaean ­Society of New York. His books include Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order, 1940–1944 and, with Michael R. Marrus, Vichy France and the Jews.


William Pfaff’s latest book is The Irony of Manifest Destiny: The Tragedy of America’s Foreign Policy.
 (June 2013)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

Robert Towers (1923–1995) was an American critic and novelist. Born in Virginia, Towers was educated at Princeton and served for two years as Vice Counsel at the American Consulate General in Calcutta before dedicating himself to literary studies. He taught English literature and creative writing at Princeton, Queens College and Columbia.

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her most recent book is Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.
 (June 2014)