Contents


A La Recherche … …de Proust

Marcel Proust: Selected Letters Volume Two, 1904–1909 edited by Philip Kolb, translated and with an introduction by Terence Kilmartin

Marcel Proust: A Biography by George D. Painter

The Ultimate Scandal

Inside Job: The Looting of America’s Savings and Loans by Stephen Pizzo, by Mary Fricker, by Paul Muolo

Other People’s Money: The Inside Story of the S&L Mess by Paul Zane Pilzer, with Robert Dietz

The Big Fix: Inside the S&L Scandal by James Ring Adams

Shylock Without Usury

Shylock Reconsidered: Jews, Moneylending, and Medieval Society by Joseph Shatzmiller

God and the Moneylenders: Usury and Law in Early Modern England by Norman Jones

The Merchant of Venice a play by William Shakespeare, directed by Peter Hall

A New, New Reich?

A History of West Germany Volume 1: From Shadow to Substance, 1945–1963; Volume 2: Democracy and Its Discontents, 1963–1988 by Dennis L. Bark, by David R. Gress

The Federal Republic of Germany at Forty edited by Peter H. Merkl

Germany, America, Europe: Forty Years of German Foreign Policy by Wolfram F. Hanrieder

Die Erinnerungen by Franz Josef Strauss

Men and Powers: A Political Retrospective by Helmut Schmidt, translated by Ruth Hein

La Nation orpheline: Les Allemagnes en Europe by Anne-Marie Le Gloannec

The Germans: Rich, Bothered and Divided the fall) by David Marsh

A German Identity, 1770–1990 by Harold James

Contributors

John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s most recent collection of poetry is Quick Question. His Collected French Translations will be published in April 2014 in two volumes, one of Prose and one of Poetry.

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

John Kenneth Galbraith (1908–2006) was a Canadian economist and politician. He taught at Princeton and Harvard. His works include The Affluent Society, The Age of Uncertainty and Economics and the Public Purpose. Galbraith’s many honors include the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Lomonosov Gold Medal, the Order of Canada, and the Padma Vibhushan, India’s second highest civilian award.

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Stephen Jay Gould (1941–2002) was an American geologist, biologist and historian of science. He taught at Harvard, where he was named Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and at NYU. His last book was Punctuated Equilibrium.

Stuart Hampshire (1914–2004) was an English philosopher. He taught at University College London, Princeton, Stanford and Oxford, where he was named Warden of Wadham College. His books include Thought and Action, Spinoza and Justice Is Conflict.

Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Stanley Hoffmann is Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser University Professor at Harvard. His most recent books are Chaos and Violence: What Globalization, Failed States, and Terrorism Mean for US Foreign Policy and Rousseau and Freedom, coedited with Christie McDonald.


Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Hugh Lloyd-Jones is the Regius Professor of Greek Emeritus at Oxford University. His many books include The Justice of Zeus, the Oxford Text of Sophocles, and three volumes of Sophocles for the Loeb Classical Library. (December 2000)

M. F. Perutz (1914–2002) was an Austrian molecular biologist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1962. He is the author of Is Science Necessary?, Protein Structure, and I Wish I’d Made You Angry Earlier.

John Weightman (1915–2004) was a critic and literary scholar. After working as a translator and announcer for the BBC French service, Weightman turned to the study of French literature. He taught at King’s College London and the University of London. His books include The Concept of the Avant-Gardeand The Cat Sat on the Mat: Language and the Absurd.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.