Contents


Life After Squirrel Nutkin

Beatrix Potter’s Letters selected by Judy Taylor

The Journal of Beatrix Potter, 1881–1897 transcribed from her code writings by Leslie Linder, foreword by Judy Taylor

Prophet in Kentucky

What Are People For?

Collected Poems, 1957–1982

The Hidden Wound

Meeting the Expectations of the Land: Essays in Sustainable Agriculture and Stewardship edited by Wendell Berry, edited by Wes Jackson, edited by Bruce Colman

Standing By Words

The Wild Birds: Six Stories of the Port William Membership

The Unsettling of America: Culture and Agriculture

The Gift of Good Land: Further Essays Cultural and Agricultural

Home Economics

A Continuous Harmony

Recollected Essays, 1965–1980

Remembering

A Place on Earth: Revision

Contributors

Janet Adam Smith (1905–1999) was a Scottish writer and critic. Educated at Oxford, she worked as an editor at a number of literary publications, including The Listener, The Criterion and New Statesman. She also edited the Faber Book of Modern Verse and its companion volume, the Faber Book of Children’s Verse. An accomplished mountaineer, Smith wrote about her adventures in Mountain Holidays; her other books include Life Among the Scots and John Buchnan and His World.

Theodore H. Draper (1912–2006) was an American historian. Educated at City College, he wrote influential studies of the American Communist Party, the Cuban Revolution and the Iran-Contra Affair. Draper was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the 1990 recipient of the Herbert Feis Award from the American Historical Association.

Viktor Erofeyev is the author of Russian Beauty, a novel, and the editor of The Penguin Book of New Russian Writing. He lives in Moscow. (March 2001)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Václav Havel (1936–2011) was the last president of Czechoslovakia and the first president of the Czech Republic. Havel was one of the six signers of the statement “Tibet: The Peace of the Graveyard.”

Christopher Hill (1912–2003) was an English historian. Educated at Oxford, Hill taught at the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire as well as Oxford, where he was elected Master of Balliol College. His books include Puritanism and Revolution,Intellectual Origins of the English Revolution, and The World Turned Upside Down.

James Joll (1936–2011) was a British historian. His books include The Origins of the First World War and Europe Since 1870.

Murray Kempton (1917-1997) was a columnist for Newsday, as well as a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books. His books include Rebellions, Perversities, and Main Events and The Briar Patch, as well as Part of Our Time. He won the Pulitzer Prize in 1985.

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

Hugh Lloyd-Jones is the Regius Professor of Greek Emeritus at Oxford University. His many books include The Justice of Zeus, the Oxford Text of Sophocles, and three volumes of Sophocles for the Loeb Classical Library. (December 2000)

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

John Maynard Smith, Professor of Biology at the University of Sussex, is the author of On Evolution, The Evolution of Sex, Evolution and the Theory of Games, and, with Eörs Szathmáry, The Major Transitions in Evolution. (December 2000)

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and of the forthcoming Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against natural gas fracking.

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor at Harvard. He received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998. His most recent book is An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions, cowritten with Jean Drèze.
 (October 2013)

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.

Leonard Thompson is Charles J. Stillé Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His books include The Political Mythology of Apartheid and A History of South Africa. (May 1998)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel into English.
 (April 2014)