Contents


A Sort of Intimate Whirlwind’

The Intimate Interiors of Edouard Vuillard an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum May 18 to July 30, 1990

The Intimate Interiors of Edouard Vuillard catalog of the exhibition by Elizabeth Wynne Easton

The Best Years of Their Lives

In Transit: The Transport Workers Union in New York City, 1933-1966 by Joshua B. Freeman

Working-Class Americanism: The Politics of Labor in a Textile City, 1914-1960 by Gary Gerstle

Workers on the Waterfront: Seamen, Longshoremen, and Unionism in the 1930s by Bruce Nelson

Underground Man

Never Come Morning by Nelson Algren, Introduction by Kurt Vonnegut Jr., interview with the author by H.E.F. Donohue

The Neon Wilderness by Nelson Algren, Introduction by Tom Corson, Afterword by Studs Terkel

The Man with the Golden Arm by Nelson Algren, introduction by James R. Giles

A Walk on the Wild Side by Nelson Algren, foreword by Russell Banks

Nelson Algren: A Life on the Wild Side by Bettina Drew

Confronting the Horror: The Novels of Nelson Algren by James R. Giles

Nelson Algren’s Chicago photographs by Art Shay

The Way to the Wall

German History, 1770-1866 (The Oxford History of Modern Europe), by James J. Sheehan

Bismarck, The White Revolutionary, Vol. I, 1815-1871, Vol. II, 1871-1898 by Lothar Gall, translated by J.A. Underwood

Bürgertum in Deutschland by Lothar Gall

Die Deutschen in ihrem Jahrhundert 1890-1990 by Christian Graf von Krockow

Letters to Freya, 1939-1945 by Helmuth James von Moltke, edited and translated by Beate Ruhm von Oppen

Fin-de-Siècle America

The Myth of America’s Decline: Leading the World Economy into the 1990s by Henry R. Nau

America’s Economic Resurgence: A Bold New Strategy by Richard Rosecrance

Peril and Promise: A Commentary on America by John Chancellor

Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power by Joseph S. Nye Jr.

Contributors

Paul Kennedy, the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Director of International Security Studies at Yale, is the author and editor of fifteen books, including The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. His latest book is The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. (November 2006)

Michael Scammell is the author of Solzhenitsyn: A Biography and Koestler: The Literary and Political Odyssey of a Twentieth-Century Skeptic.
He is Professor Emeritus of Writing and Translation at Columbia.
 (March 2013)

Stephen Toulmin (1922–2009) was a British philosopher. First outlined in The Uses of Argument, his model for analyzing arguments has had a lasting influence on fields as diverse as law, computer science and communications theory. Toulmin’s other works include The Abuse of Casuistry: A History of Moral Reasoning and Return to Reason.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. His new book, Making Make-Believe Real: Politics as Theater in Shakespeare’s Time, will be published in the summer 2014.